In Remembrance of Christina Murphy

Christina Murphy

 

By Steve Sherwood, Director, TCU Center for Writing; Joe Law, WAC Director, Wright State University and professor of English (retired); Bonnie Devet, Professor of English / Director of the Writing Lab Department of English College of Charleston; Pam Childers, endowed chair as Director of the Writing Center at the McCallie School in Chattanooga (retired)


One of the greats in our field has died, and a lot of those who loved and admired her found out only recently about her passing. 

Steve Sherwood:

Dr. Christina Murphy, the inaugural director of Texas Christian University’s Writing Center and the author or coauthor of a number of notable and award-winning works about writing centers, died on October 13, 2018, of a brief illness.

After directing TCU’s William L. Adams Center for Writing from 1988-1996, she left TCU to become the chair of the English Department at University of Memphis and later accepted positions as Associate Dean of William Patterson University and Dean of Marshall University.  Nevertheless, she continued to contribute to writing center scholarship and to maintain friendships with a number of writing center professionals.

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CfP || The Writing Center Journal Special Issue: Transatlantic Writing Centers

The Writing Center Journal seeks contributions for a special issue, co-edited with Katrin Girgensohn from Europa-Universität Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), Germany, focusing on the transatlantic writing center conversation. Originally created in the United States to address US-based educational concerns (Boquet, 1999; Lerner 2009), writing centers have now expanded globally, as has accompanying scholarship (Bräuer, Carlino, Ganobcsik-Williams, Sinha, 2012). Christiane Donahue has identified a tendency among US theorists towards “‘othering’ countries that have different, complex, but well-established traditions in both writing research and writing instruction” (2009). We recognize this othering tendency in the writing center community, as well. Because the first writing centers outside the US were established in Canada in the 1960s and 1970s (Graves, 2017) and in Europe in the 1990s (Bräuer, 2002), they have a decades-long sustained engagement in writing center studies–with both reformulations and novel practices emerging (e.g., Scott, 2017). Study of transatlantic writing centers, which have evolved in their own right, thus has much to offer our increasingly globalized writing center community.