Writing Center Spotlight: Daystar University Writing and Speech Centre (Kenya)

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Brenda Wambua, Director of the Writing and Speech Centre at Day Star University in Kenya

Editor’s note: During these scary unprecedented months, we are still focused on connecting you to your writing center colleagues around the world. This week, Brenda Wambua, Director of the Writing and Speech Centre in Daystar University in Kenya, shares about her writing and speech centre. You can learn more about the center through their Facebook page: Writing and Speech Centre – Daystar University or visiting their website (linked here).

The Daystar University Writing and Speech Centre (WSC) is affiliated with Daystar University, a chartered Christian University in Kenya. The university has six schools and approximately 5,000 students. English is the main language of instruction in the University although other languages like Kiswahili and French are taught. Continue reading

Webinar Invitation: Transitioning Your Writing Center Online

Editor’s Note: We are sharing this message from Dr. Lisa Cahill of Arizona State University. Please consider attending this webinar. We would also like to thank Dr. Cahill and the Arizona State University Writing Center for hosting this free webinar. 

Greetings!

As many of us have recently moved our writing center operations to online formats (or are currently in the process of doing so), I’m writing to share information about a free webinar being offered on two different dates:  Sunday, March 22 (2-3 pm, Arizona time) and Monday, March 23 (12-1 pm, Arizona time) by Arizona State University.

Webinar Description:

The Arizona State University Writing Center is hosting a free webinar to share how it has operationalized the transition to a fully digital delivery model. Continue reading

How’re you doing?

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CWCAB friends,

We are in uncertain times.  Some of us are having to move our centers completely online for the first time while others of us might have to close for a while.

Come what may, we are a strong, helpful, and encouraging community.  Let’s come together and support each other.

In the Comments box below, let us know how your center is adapting to the present situation? Have you had to move your tutoring completely online? If so, what platforms are you using? How are you working out schedules, tech issues etc? What questions do you have as you adapt?

Are there any tips you have found helpful and could share with the rest of our community?

Please post your comments below or write to us at writinglabnewsletterblog@gmail.com and we will gladly share your thoughts here.

But before we go, here’s a little something out of Italy to cheer us all up and remind us of the power of creativity in resilience!

Writing Center Spotlight: The Haigazian University Writing Center (Lebanon)

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Editor’s note: We’re spotlighting writing centers around the world! This week, Anita Moutchoyan shared about the Haigazian University Writing Center in Lebanon which she directs. You can learn more about the center by visiting its Instagram page: HU-Writing Center or its Facebook page: Writing Center – Haigazian University. 

Poetry Workshop at Haigazian University Writing Center

The Haigazian University Writing Center is affiliated with Haigazian University which was established as a liberal arts institution in 1955 in Beirut, Lebanon. The university is inspired by the Armenian Evangelical heritage and operates on the United States model of higher education, using English as the language of instruction while offering courses in Arabic and Armenian. The university offers the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Business Administration, Bachelor of Science, Master of Arts, and Master of Business Administration degrees.

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Announcement: TESOL Arabia Conference & Exhibition Postponed

 

The TESOL Arabia Conference and Exhibition LLC has been postponed. See the message below from the Middle East and North Africa Writing Center Association.

 

Dear All,
In light of recent developments regarding travel restrictions around the world and in the Gulf region due the Covid-19 Corona virus, TESOL Arabia Conference and Exhibitions, LLC, regrets the postponement of the 25th International TESOL Arabia Conference and Exhibition until September  25-27, 2020, at The Ritz-Carlton Abu Dhabi, Grant Canal.

For information regarding reimbursement of conference fees if you are unable to attend the event in September, please contact info@tesol-arabia.org We are very sorry for any inconvenience and deeply regret the postponement of the conference.

Do you have any changes to your conference on account of Covid-19? Feel free to share here.

Rewind & Reset: A Conversation with Ben Rafoth

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Editor’s note: With technology rapidly shifting how we write and read, we at CWCAB are thinking about what different digital innovations mean for the writing center’s work and its relevance in the academy. That’s why, for this week’s Rewind & Reset, we are sharing a portion of a conversation between CWCAB’s former editor Josh Ambrose and Ben Rafoth that took place in August 2015. In this part of their conversation, Rafoth suggests innovations that might defy some of our long-held beliefs about tutoring but could still help us stay relevant.

Ben Rafoth

Ben Rafoth is a leading scholar and author in the field of writing centers and writing studies. Ben is Emeritus Director of the Kathleen Jones White Writing Center at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania.  During the time of this interview, he shared with Josh Ambrose, our first WLN blog editor, that “I’ve been very lucky. I’ve had great teachers and awesome students, and the hundreds of tutors I’ve been fortunate to work with in my writing center at IUP have made all the difference.” He teaches graduate courses in the Composition and TESOL program at IUP, and has served as its director. In 2010, Ben was named IUP’s Distinguished University Professor, a lifetime title and the highest award for faculty at IUP.

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Meet the authors of WLN’s newly released D.E.C. on transfer in the writing center

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D.E.C. Editors, Dana Lynn Driscoll, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, & Bonnie Devet, College of Charleston

Dr. Bonnie Devet contributed this piece. In her previous blog post, she provided an overview of the newly released Digital Edited Collection, Transfer of Learning in the Writing Center, which she co-edited with Dr. Dana L. Driscoll and with Design Editor, Jialei Jiang.  Here, Dr. Devet introduces us to the authors of the collection and their inspirations for researching/studying transfer in the writing center.  

The authors of WLN’s second Digital Edited Collection, Transfer of Learning in the Writing Center, can attest that different sources inspire their scholarship: from faculty comments, being a tutor in a center, conference presentations, and research. In this Digital Edited Collection, they examine the history of transfer in shaping centers, provide detailed scenarios about transfer occurring in tutorials and conclude by moving beyond the center showing that tutors’ skills transfer into careers.

Why do the D.E.C. authors think transfer of learning is vital to centers and how did they become interested in transfer?

Marcus Meade, University of Virginia

Marcus Meade discovered his interest in transfer from assisting student-athletes: “I had conversations with them about what they learned in athletics that might help them as writers and students. That started a long project related to transfer and writing instruction that, in part, focused on how wc work differs from the writing classroom in the conditions that might foster transfer.”

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It’s here! WLN’s 2nd Digital Edited Collection discusses transfer of learning in the writing center

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Editor’s Note: Dr. Bonnie Devet, Professor of English and Director of the Writing Lab at the College of Charleston, contributed this piece. 

It’s finally here! The Digital Edited Collection (D.E.C) Transfer of Learning in the Writing Center (Eds. Bonnie Devet and Dana Driscoll; Design Editor, Jialei Jiang) was just released! It’s the second D.E.C from WLN: A Journal of Writing Center Scholarship, and it offers tutors and directors new perspectives into how knowledge is “cued, primed, and guided” (Perkins and Salomon, 1989); that is, how both tutors and their student writers engage in the transfer of learning.

To access the DEC, click this link. The DEC includes videos, graphics, teaching materials, and research data and is accessible to our colleagues around the world.  Continue reading

Registration is now open for the IWCA Summer Institute in Santa Fe, NM

Registration is now open for the IWCA Summer Institute! The 2020 IWCA Summer Institute will be held in Santa Fe, New Mexico from Sunday, June 14th through Friday, June 19th.

To register, log in to the IWCAmembers.org portal, or if you have never created an account, create a new account and then register. Registration is $900. The deadline to register is April 1st, 2020. 

Limited grants (up to ½ the registration cost) are available to help support attendees. At least one grant is reserved for a person of color/member of a historically marginalized group. Please apply by March 15th, 2020 to be considered for a grant.

Find out more about the Institute by clicking on this link.

Call for Proposals | AWAC-Sponsored Panel, European Writing Centers Association Conference

 

The International Collaborations Committee of the Association for Writing Across the Curriculum (https://www.wacassociation.org/) is issuing a call for proposals for an AWAC-sponsored panel at the European Writing Centers Association conference to take place in Graz, Austria, from July 8-11, 2020. Please see the EWCA conference website for more details and information about the overall conference theme, “Writing Centers as Spaces of Empowerment”: https://europeanwritingcenters-2020.uni-graz.at/en/

Please submit proposals as attached Word files via email, with the subject line “AWAC-Sponsored Panel EWCA 2020,” NO LATER THAN JAN. 25, 2020, to:

Chris Anson: chris_anson@ncsu.edu
Federico Navarro: navarro@uoh.cl

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Welcome to 2020! A Message from Your CWCAB Editors

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Anna Habib, Editor, CWCAB, WLN Blog

Esther Namubiru, Associate Editor, CWCAB, WLN Blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy New Year to our writing center friends and colleagues around the world!

As we enter the new year and a new semester, we wanted to take this opportunity to formally introduce ourselves as the new editors of Connecting Writing Centers across Borders, a blog of the Writing Lab Newsletter: A Journal of Writing Center Scholarship. As many of you know from the announcement on the wcenter listserv last Fall, Brian Hotson stepped down as the Editor in the beginning of the Fall semester to work on a book project and launch a digital writing project journal. I served as his Associate Editor for a semester and was honored that he asked me to step in as the Editor. I have since invited Esther Namubiru to join me as Associate Editor.  Continue reading

2020 is almost here! See how far we’ve come: Accomplishments in WCs & the Field

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As we get ready for a new year, we want to pause and reflect on how far we have come as tutors, writers, writing center administrators, and scholars.

  • What are some of your writing center-related successes (big or small) over the last ten years that we can all celebrate?
  • What trends, ideas, and connections have you explored in your corner of the world to move our writing center community forward?

We would love to hear from you. Tell us your thoughts in the Comments box below and let’s reflect and celebrate together!

And, most importantly…..

 

“The Art of It All:” Thoughts from 2019 IWCA Conference Chairs

Are you planning to attend this year’s IWCA Conference? Check out these quick thoughts from Mike Mattison and Laura Benton, the conference Co-Chairs. They chatted with us about the relevance of the conference theme for international writing center administrators and tutors. 
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CfP & keynotes || Suresh Canagarajah and Stephanie Bell >> 3rd Academic Writing and English Language Learners Conference, November 1 and 2, 2019

Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, NS

Registration is open.

We are please to announce two keynotes:

Suresh Canagarajah, Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of Applied Linguistics, English, and Asian Studies
Dr. Canagarajah, named as one of the top 50 scholars who have shaped the field of TESOL by TESOL International, is the Edwin Erle Sparks Professor in the Departments of Applied Linguistics and English at Pennsylvania State University, as well as the Director of the Migration Studies Project. Among many other awards, Dr. Canagarajah is a recipient of the Distinguished Scholarship and Service Award by the American Association of Applied Linguistics; the Mina P. Shaughnessy Award (2015) by the Modern Language Association for the Outstanding Scholarly Book in the Fields of Language, Culture, Literacy, or Literature for his book Translingual Practice: Global Englishes and Cosmopolitan Relations (2013); Best Book Award (2016) from the American Association of Applied Linguistics for Translingual Practice: Global Englishes and Cosmopolitan Relations (2013). He is the author of more than 10 books and dozens of book chapters, academic articles, and other publications, both in English and Tamil. His book, Critical Academic Writing and Multilingual Students (2002), is required reading in the field of academic writing and multilingual instruction.

Stephanie Bell,
Writing Centre Director, York University

Dr. Bell is Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies and Director of the Writing Centre at York University. She has delivered multiple presentations on digital writing and production at conferences for the International Writing Centres Association, Canadian Writing Centres Association, and Canadian Association for the Study of Discourse and Writing. She is a board member of the Canadian Writing Centres Association. Her digital student production forum, Scratch Media, features podcasts and other media produced through her writing courses. A co-authored monograph proposal, “Bring a hard copy to your appointment”: Tooled-up, networked, multimodal writing at the Writing Centre, is in submission to with Inkshed Publications.

The conference for Academic Writing and English Language Learners (AWELL) is a two-day conference designed for faculty, instructors, and writing centre professionals who teach and tutor ELL students. The goal of the conference is to provide tools and approaches that may be used directly in classrooms and tutoring sessions.

Continue reading

CfP & Conference ||Northern California Writing Centers Association (NCWCA) >> April 5-6, 2019, San Jose State University

Northern California Writing Centers Association (NCWCA), April 5-6, 2019, San Jose, CA
San Jose State University is pleased to host the 2019 NCWCA Conference.
Visit our website to review the CFP and submit a proposal: sjsu.edu/ncwca.
Proposals are due January 14, 2019 by midnight PST.

Placing a Piece of the Puzzle: Translingualism and International Deaf Writers

Manako Yabe is a PhD candidate in Disability Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her biographical article, “The Journey of a Deaf Translingual Writer” was published by the Writing on the Edge in the Spring 2018 issue.

 

My participation in the 2018 Canadian Writing Centres Association Conference (CWCA) was like a putting the pieces of a puzzle together. I am an international Deaf student who has been to writing centers for more than a decade. As a Deaf writer, I was honored to share my story at the CWCA conference. I was also excited to meet writing center professionals and learn about the writing centers in Canada.

When I participated in the conference, the Keynote speaker was Dr. Sheelah McLean—a co-founder of the Idle No More movement. As I listened to Dr. McLean speak, I realized that there were commonalities between Indigenous students and Deaf students.

Historically, many Ingenious students grew up by attending White-centered schools, trying to assimilate into the White-centered culture, speaking standard English, and behaving like White people. The use of Indigenous language was banned by residential schools. In the same way, many Deaf students grew up attending mainstream schools without accommodation, trying to assimilate into hearing culture, speaking orally, and trying to behave like hearing people. The use of sign language was banned at mainstream schools.

When I wrote an essay about Deaf people, I was often asked to affix a lower case ‘d’ to the term “deaf people,” which signified a person’s inability to hear. However, I was asked not to affix a capital letter ‘D’ to the term “Deaf people” although it signified persons who identified with Deaf culture. This was an example of cultural repression because my editors were not familiar with Deaf culture, and the differences between people who are culturally Deaf people and those people who are non-culturally deaf people. This experience is similar to that experienced by Ingenious students who were often asked to fix their Indigenous language to conform to standard English, because of lack of cultural linguistic awareness and hundreds of year of cultural repression and genocide.

In my round-table discussion, I discussed the concept of translingualism. The term translingual originated from Language Difference in Writing: Toward a Translingual Approach (Horner et al, 2011)—which states, in part, “this approach sees difference in language not as a barrier to overcome or as a problem to manage, but as a resource for producing meaning in writing, speaking, reading, and listening” (p. 303). Although many scholars have addressed translingualism for multilingual speakers, little attention has been paid to multilingual signers. Since the translingual approach could be beneficial for indigenous student writers, I argued for the inclusion of “signing” in this definition as well, since because a translingual approach could also apply to Deaf writers. Continue reading

Register Now for the Online IWCA Collaborative || “Stories from the Center: Activism, Outreach, and Research”

On March 12, 2018 from 12:00-8:30 PM CST an exciting lineup of current and future leaders will facilitate interactive sessions on this year’s theme:

“Stories from the Center: Activism, Outreach, and Research”

Register today and join the presenters and other participants from 4 different countries and 20 different states as we embark on the first-ever online event.

Please register by Friday, March 9th, so we can send you log in and set up instructions for joining us in the Adobe Connect meeting space before Monday.

Registration is only $30 and with it you also get exclusive post-event access to the recorded sessions. That means you can watch on demand sessions you missed and attended!

If you have any questions, please email us at IWCACollaborative2018@gmail.com

See you Online in Realtime!

Lauri Dietz & Joseph Cheatle

Register
IWCA Collaborative Agenda
Meet the Speakers

 

中国高校英文写作中心国际学术研讨会 (2018) , 中国浙江大学

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Symposium of English Writing Centers in Chinese Universities (2018) | Zhejiang University, China

Webinar from WLN || Introduction to Publishing in WLN: A Journal of Writing Center Scholarship || Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, 3-4pm

WLN is proud to announce our first webinar:  “Introduction to Publishing in WLN:  A Journal of Writing Center Scholarship.”

Friday, February 23, 2018, 3:00pm to 4:00pm E.S.T.

This event will cover WLN’s process of publishing, scholarly genres, and other information, hosted by WLN Associate Editors Elizabeth Kleinfeld, Julie Prebel, and Sohui Lee.

There will be opportunities for Q & A.

If you’ve thought of submitting to WLN, this is an excellent opportunity to hear from us on the process.

The webinar is free, but please R.S.V.P. at:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/introduction-to-publishing-in-wln-a-journal-of-writing-center-scholarship-tickets-41031721985.