CFP: Special Issue of WLN – Writing Center & Library Collaborations

We invite you to submit a proposal to a special issue of the WLN! For this issue, we are calling for papers that offer creative or innovative ideas for collaboration between writing centers and libraries. We are particularly interested in collaboratively-authored articles that involve both writing center and library staff. Continue reading

CfP || Join the International Researcher’s Consortium workshop at CCCC 2020

For the twelfth year, the International Researcher’s Consortium will host a workshop at the annual College Conference on Composition and Communication (CCCC) conference located in the U.S. We are inviting brief proposals for up to twenty-four researcher-participant roles focused on international or transnational research about writing in higher education from all over the world (see details below about what this might include). By research, we mean a project with a focused research question, an identified methodology (qualitative, quantitative, ethnographic, historical, discourse analysis, corpus, etc), and the collection of data in some form. This research can be at any stage and does not need to be final. Your role in the workshop would be to provide a draft text about the research by the end of December 2019, to read the other workshop facilitators’ texts before attending the CCCC conference, and to participate in the day-long workshop by leading a discussion about your project and participating in discussions of a subset of others’ projects.
 
We know that researchers around the world are interested in finding sites for serious cross-national conversation that includes multiple research traditions. This workshop is designed to make space available for extended time to read, process, think through, and discuss in detail each other’s work at the College Conference on Composition and Communication, March 25-28, 2020, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. See the overall conference Call for Proposals theme here. Though your research is not required to connect to conference themes, this year’s theme is about inclusivity, tradition, innovation and the commonplace. We see this kind of workshop as a form of “inclusivity,” a means of articulating the commonplace to become more aware. Making research about writing connect across cultures, higher education systems and languages is an activity that pushes the boundaries of tradition and enables inclusivity. It leads to the creation of many different kinds of texts and informs our future scholarly and praxis-based efforts toward inclusivity.

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Internationalization, Massification, and the Knowledge Economy: A Comparison of International Writing Center Trends

Tomoyo Okuda graduated with a Ph.D. in Teaching English as a Second Language from the University of British Columbia, Canada. Her research interests include second language writing, writing center studies, internationalization of higher education, and language policy.

 

Christiane Donahue (2009) once praised the writing center community as having the “strongest development in terms of exchange of teaching practice and pedagogical framing, always explored in context” (p. 222). This is evident from the fact that we can find writing centers in 63 countries, according to the St. Cloud State University’s Writing Center Directory.

I was always interested in why writing centers became so popular around the world and started collecting literature written about writing centers in different countries (as a side note, I focused on writing center development in Japan for my dissertation research, “The Writing Center as a Global Pedagogy: A Case Study of a Japanese University Seeking Internationalization”). A common topic found in international writing center literature was how the idea of the writing center needed adjustments to suit the cultural, religion, existing literacy practices of each country or institution. But I was more interested in the bigger picture—the socio-political/economic imperatives of writing center initiation, namely, the political landscape of higher education discourses and reforms fed into the decision to initiate or sustain a writing center (Salem, 2014). In this blog post, I would like to discuss three imperatives identified from my reading of international writing center literature (book chapters, articles, reports, websites).

Internationalization has become a powerful agenda for many universities around the world, and for non-English speaking countries, this means internationalizing higher education through the medium of English. Thus, we can see English-medium instruction programs (courses and programs taught in English) in what Harbord (2010) calls US-style universities: universities with “US accreditation, US charter, US-style curriculum, US grading system, a liberal arts approach, and some faculty from the US” (para. 9). Examples of US-style universities would be liberal arts colleges in Hungary, India, and Japan, and American branch universities such as in Saudi Arabia, the UAE, France, Bulgaria, where the writing center is usually managed in conjunction with first year composition courses. Another internationalization initiative for universities is scholarly publications in English and for this purpose, some writing centers in East Asia offer services to help scholars write research manuscripts in English. For instance, according to Kim (2017), the government-supported globalization initiative called ‘Brain Korea 21’, which aims to foster international scholars, led to a wave of new writing centers in South Korean universities. Continue reading