Call for Proposals: Special Issue of WLN  

Submitted by Susan DeRosa and Stephen Ferruci, Associate Professors of English Eastern CT State University

Susan DeRosa and Stephen Ferruci are Associate Professors of English at Eastern Connecticut State University. They co-authored the textbook, Choices Writers Make: A Guide (Pearson, 2011), and they have collaborated lately on scholarly articles and conference papers on multimodal writing in the writing center and writing classroom. Their research laid the groundwork for the creation of Eastern’s Writing Center in 2008.

Title: Multimodal Writing in the Writing Center: Relationships, Roles, and Responsibilities

Students are increasingly composing and designing multimodal texts that combine sound, visual, performative, and textual components. Takayoshi and Selfe (2007) argue that students need to be versed in both critically reading and producing multimodal texts “if they hope to communicate successfully within the digital communication networks that characterize workplaces, schools, civic life, and span traditional cultural, national, and geopolitical borders” (3). As writers produce multimodal texts to respond to different rhetorical situations and assignments, writing centers need to find ways to work with students and the texts they design. While writing centers may have experience helping writers who include visual elements in their texts, (photos, graphs, charts, etc.), they may be less familiar with other modes with which writers choose to compose. Recent scholarship suggests a focus on these changing roles and the relationships between writing centers and writing classrooms as we engage with multimodal composers and their choices.

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CFP: Special Issue of WLN–What We Believe and Why: Educating Writing Tutors

Guest editors Karen Johnson and Ted Roggenbuck share their call for proposals, below.

Key to our success in the important work of writing centers is our effectiveness in providing tutor education. Our field has over three decades of scholarship on how to educate writing tutors in a multitude of settings, but the wealth and variety of resources can create challenges for those seeking guidance. However, that we also have a number of excellent and popular (though not universally used) resources such as The Bedford Guide for Writing Tutors, The Longman Guide to Peer Tutoring, and The Oxford Guide for Writing Tutors does suggest at least some consistency in how we educate tutors. But to what degree do we share core beliefs about tutor education, how do we know what aspects of our programs to prepare writing tutors are most effective, and to what areas are we not paying adequate attention? Moreover, what are effective contexts for educating tutors? Although credit-bearing courses appear to be ideal contexts for tutor education, what particular aspects of a course make it effective? And for directors who are unable to offer a course or even paid time for educating tutors, how can they effectively prepare tutors for the different rhetorical situations and writers they will encounter?

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“Transfer of Learning in the Writing Center” CFP: Special Issue of WLN

Guest Editors: Dana Lynn Driscoll (Indiana University of Pennsylvania) and Bonnie Devet (College of Charleston)

A vital topic in higher education is transfer of learning, or what is generally known as students’ ability to adapt, apply, or remix prior knowledge and skills in new contexts, including educational, civic, personal, and professional.  As recent writing center scholarship attests, transfer of learning is of key importance to the work we do in writing centers, both with our work with clients but also with our tutors themselves.

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For this special issue of the WLN, we encourage contributors to consider, as starting points, some of the following questions related to transfer and centers:

  • How might transfer be defined and considered in a writing center context?
  • How does transfer help characterize the development of consultants, both novice and expert?
  • How do consultants transfer knowledge between settings?
  • What strategies can consultants use to support and encourage clients’ transfer of prior knowledge and skills during sessions?
  • How do clients use the writing center to transfer writing knowledge between courses?
  • What role do dispositions play in transfer in a writing center context?
  • What can writing center directors do to help prepare tutors to better support transfer?
  • How can transfer of learning be a primary mission for writing centers?

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“Reading in the Writing Center” CFP: Special Issue of WLN

carillo_e-150x150Guest editor Ellen C. Carillo is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Connecticut and the Writing Program Coordinator at its Waterbury Campus. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in composition and literature, and is the author of Securing a Place for Reading in Composition: The Importance of Teaching for Transfer (Utah State UP, 2015). Her scholarship has been published in WLN; Rhetoric Review; Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture; Reader: Essays in Reader-Oriented Theory, Criticism, and Pedagogy; Feminist Teacher; Currents in Teaching and Learning; and in several edited collections. Ellen is co-founder of the Role of Reading in Composition Studies Special Interest Group of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) and has presented her scholarship at many conferences including IWCA, CCCC, and MLA. She was recently awarded a research grant from CWPA for a project on transfer in writing centers.

Prior to a 2012 change in the Conference on College Composition and Communication’s (CCCC) call for proposals, Mariolina Salvatori and Patricia Donahue found that it had been almost two decades since composition’s professional organization encouraged panels and presentations on reading at their annual convention. Despite the long silence surrounding reading in composition, in the last five years or so many compositionists have returned to crucial questions related to reading, writing’s counterpart in the construction of meaning. For example, compositionists have been conducting studies that explore how instructors attend to reading in first-year writing courses (Bunn) and how focusing on reading early in students’ academic careers can affect their success in their majors (Lockhart and Soliday). Others seek to expose the false print-digital binary that overemphasizes the differences between print-based and digital reading (Horning; Morris).

Because writing centers are rich interdisciplinary sites that challenge both physical and conceptual boundaries among disciplines and between novices and experts, writing center studies is positioned to expand current discussions about reading. Writing center professionals’ perspectives have the potential to enrich these theoretical discussions, and their work on the ground has the potential to support more comprehensive literacy tutoring. Still, writing center studies has yet to join the conversation.

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CFP: Special Issue of WLN- The Affective Dimension of Writing Center Work

Guest editors: Kathy Evertz and Renata Fitzgerald for The WLN Journal

During any given conference, writing center consultants and writers may experience feelings that range from joy and satisfaction to anger and frustration, any of which can foster or impede a writer’s development or performance.  Yet in a literature rich with examinations of the cognitive, pedagogical, political, and ethical dimensions of interacting with writers, the affective dimension of writing centers often goes unaddressed or is deemed secondary to other concerns.  We invite writing center workers to help spark a conversation that foregrounds how emotions, motivations, values, and attitudes can influence what does or does not happen in writing conferences, both for those who visit and those who staff our centers.

WLNResearch shows that positive mood enhances feelings of self-efficacy, while negativity can be corrosive (Tillema, et al.).  One way the affective dimension can overwhelm the cognitive in writing centers is when a writer is uncomfortable with the demands of academic discourse. Ivanic explains, “Students often face a crisis of identity, feeling that they have to become a different sort of person in order to participate in these context-specific and culture-specific knowledge-making practices of academic institutions” (344). Challenges to writers’ and/or consultants’ identities can lead to feelings of anxiety and vulnerability.

We encourage contributors to consider, as starting points, moments when the emotional can overwhelm the cognitive in a writing conference; whether disregarding a writer’s and/or one’s values, motivations, and attitudes impedes or enhances a writer’s growth; whether consultants should strive to balance the affective and cognitive; and what is gained or lost by addressing the affective dimension in writing conferences.

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CFP: Second Conference on Latin American Writing Centers and Programs

October 28th and 29th of 2015-Universidad de los Andes-Bogotá, Colombia

A student ́s admission to a university represents an immersion into a context filled with new objectives, goals, rules, and methods. As part of this process, it is fundamental to be able to understand the ideas of others as well as be able to transmit one ́s own. This allows students to actively engage in an academic community through an intellectual discussion that is based on specific criteria. In this scenario, writing becomes a privileged tool in order to learn and evidence the central comprehensions in every academic discipline. Thus, the role of writing centers and programs is focused on assisting the communicative processes of the university community, so that its members can effectively participate in academic life. Within this purpose, the support that can be provided in order to aid student retention at the college level is essential.

With the intention of generating a space that fosters sharing and discussion with respect to the role of writing in the academic development of university students, the Latin American Network of Writing Centers and Programs (Red Latinoamericana de Centros y Programas de Escritura) invites all involved in this type of initiatives at the college level to participate in its second conference, which will take place October 28th and 29th at Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia. In particular, we are interested in discussing retention strategies that arise from writing centers and programs. Thus, we seek proposals directly related to this issue or to the following topics:

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“Religion in the Writing Center”–CFP

May/June 2016 Special Issue of WLN: A Journal of Writing Center Scholarship: “Religion in the Writing Center”

Proposals will be accepted though May 30, 2015.
Invitations to submit full articles will be issued by July 1, 2015.
Manuscripts will be due on December 31, 2015.

Guest editor: Lisa Zimmerelli, Assistant Professor of Writing and Writing Center Director, Loyola University Maryland

Religion in the Writing Center, May/June 2016 Special Issue

2789691676_39bb997f54_oAlthough a robust conversation around race, class, gender, and sexual identity has emerged within writing center studies, religion as a category of identity remains under-theorized in our field, perhaps because of its characterization as intimate, personal, and almost irreproachably private. Harry Denny’s consideration of the “politics attendant” to sex and gender in Facing the Center draws attention to the way in which “private” aspects of identity are performed in social contexts and how they shape and are shaped by political discourse.

Likewise, within composition studies, the obfuscation of religious belief in the academy has been noted. According to Anne Gere “because discussions of religion have been essentially off-limits in higher education, we have failed to develop sophisticated and nuanced theoretical discourses to articulate spirituality” (Brandt et al. 46). Elizabeth Vander Lei and bonnie kyburz’s Negotiating Religious Faith in the Composition Classroom represents an important move towards developing such a language around religion and writing. However, as Vander Lei and Lauren Fitzgerald observe in “What in God’s Name? Administering the Conflicts of Religious Belief in Writing Programs,” this scholarship has a rather limited focus on the role of religious belief on the composing practices of students. Vander Lei and Fitzgerald challenge “WPAs, as campus leaders with a vested interest in writing and public discourse…to work with students, instructors, and administrators to develop practices that address religious belief ethically and effectively” (185).

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CFP: CCCC Workshop on Research About Writing in Higher Education Outside the US

We are inviting brief proposals for up to twenty-four researcher-participant roles in a U.S. College Conference on Composition and Communication (CCCC) workshop focused on research about writing in higher education outside of the U.S.

We know that researchers around the world are interested in finding sites, physical and figurative, for serious cross-national conversation that includes multiple research traditions.

For the eighth year, we are planning to propose a workshop that (if accepted) will take place at the annual CCCC conference. The conference next year is in Tampa, Florida, US, from March 18-21, 2015.

The workshop is tentatively titled Deep Rewards and Serious Risks in International Higher Education Writing Research: Comfort Zones and Contact Zones.

This workshop, along with the exchanges we have before meeting at the conference, is designed to make space available at the CCCC conference for extended time to read, process, think through, and discuss in detail each other’s work. We have learned, through seven previous workshops and other international exchanges, that we all need this kind of time for real exchange, given that we come from different linguistic, institutional, political, geographic, theoretical and pedagogical places.

We want to engage researcher-participants from many countries and research traditions in an equal exchange dialogue, learning from each other: the primary focus is on the writing research itself.

The research can be focused on teaching or studying writing in any language. We are willing to help with translation of a text into English as needed, if the paper is accepted for the workshop.

The brief proposal should describe a research project you would be interested in sharing with other facilitators and participants. It can be completed or in process. By research, we mean a project with a focused research question, an identified methodology (qualitative, quantitative, ethnographic, historical, discourse analysis, etc), and the collection of data in some form.

The project should be “international” for a U.S. audience, by which we mean (*only* for the purposes of this U.S. call!!) carried out by either scholars in countries other than the U.S. or scholars collaborating deeply across borders, including U.S. borders, in any language. Your role in the workshop would be to provide a draft text about the research by the end of December 2014, to read the other facilitators’ texts before attending the CCCC conference, and to participate in the day-long workshop by leading a discussion about your project and participating in discussions of a subset of others’ projects.

View the 2014 Workshop Proposal to get an idea of what the overall proposal will look like. We’ve included the titles from last year’s workshop to give you an idea of the kinds of work we’ve exchanged in past sessions. We will send out a draft of the 2015 overall proposal when you send in your project description. You will be welcome to suggest changes to the overall proposal at that point. You may notice that the proposal is written with a U.S. readership in mind–this is because the proposal review committee is comprised primarily of U.S. scholars. We seek to convince this audience that many CCCC attendees have much to learn from writing research in traditions other than the ones they find most familiar–that writing research needs multiple perspectives from multiple contexts and traditions. We also know how critical it is for all scholars to be directly engaged with projects and research models from multiple research traditions.

Please submit your proposal by April 25th. The International Workshop Proposal Template includes the questions you will need to answer as you prepare your proposal. This proposal can be quite informal (it serves to help us determine appropriate projects, and only the title will appear in the program), so please feel free to send something along.

We strongly encourage you to submit a proposal to the CCCC as individual presenters, as well. The CCCC format does allow individuals to present at both a workshop and a concurrent session (it does not allow individuals to present at more than one concurrent session).

Thank you! Please write with any questions at all.

Cinthia Gannett and Tiane (Christiane) Donahue

Call for Participation – Global Writing Centers Course

Colleagues,

I am teaching a graduate/advanced undergraduate course at DePaul University (Chicago) beginning in late March that will focus on writing centers and writing programs WORLDWIDE.  As one of our projects, I’d like my students, who are themselves writing tutors in our writing center here at DePaul, to forge connections with others doing similar work (working with students and their writing, working within WID programs of any variety—in English and in the home languages) to exchange ideas about approaches, practices, challenges, and issues.   This communication/collaboration/participation would be done on an informal basis, using asynchronous or synchronous conferencing (email, Skype, etc.).

Right now, course planning is a work-in-progress.  If any of you are interested, I would love to hear from you.

Darsie Bowden
dbowden@depaul.edu

 

CFP: Sixth Symposium on Writing Centers in Asia

The Sixth Symposium on Writing Centers in Asia will be held on Saturday,
March 8, 2014, in Tokyo, Japan. It will be hosted this year by J.F.
Oberlin University in conjunction with the Writing Centers Association
of Japan.

Proposals are sought in all areas of research and practice related to
writing centers as well as the teaching and learning of writing. Both
research- and practice-based presentations are welcome. The submission
deadline is February 3, 2014.

For more information, visit the conference site.

CFP: Symposium Supporting English Writing Competencies, March 27-28, 2014 (Lueneburg, Germany)

The one and a half day symposium “Supporting English Writing Competencies: The Role of Writing Centers in Second Language Learning” at Leuphana University, Lüneburg, March 27-28, 2014, focuses on different organizational structures for L2 writing support within European universities and provides the opportunity for professionals to exchange L2, and particularly English composition teaching practices.
 
We will provide a forum for writing center personnel (professional staff and students tutors/consultants), lecturers and faculty in foreign language departments, lecturers and faculty who teach in English or other languages in an L2 context, non-university affiliated second language specialists, university administrators and staff, and those interested starting a writing center. We particularly invite colleagues who address writing competencies in L2 contexts other than English.
There are two ways to present your work at the symposium:
 
1. Poster Session
We welcome 250-300-word poster proposals for an interactive poster and networking session on Friday afternoon. Possible topics include:
·      Program development at your ESL/L2 writing center
·      The role of ESL/L2 writing competencies within your institution and department
·      Research projects on writing competencies in an ESL/L2 context
·      Teaching strategies/techniques that emphasize academic writing in ESL/L2 contexts
·      Composition support for discipline-specific genres
·      Interdisciplinary academic writing
2. Presentations
We invite proposals (500 words maximum) for 15 minute presentations with 10 minute questions and answer sessions on best practices for L2 composition support. Possible topics include:
·      Writing Center pedagogies
·      Writing Across the Curriculum Initiatives
·   Navigating discipline-specific writing conventions such as those found in the natural sciences, social sciences, business, etc.
·   Integrating writing in foreign language classrooms/centers Using online tools for in-class peer feedback and opportunities for teaching ESL/L2 writing online
·   Writing skills in English for Academic Purposes
Deadline for Submission: January 24, 2014, midnight (CET), to writingcompetencies@leuphana.de

CFP: New collection on writing research & pedagogy in the MENA region

As Composition Studies and related disciplines make a “global turn,” there is an increasing need for research into post-secondary writing practices and pedagogy in the Middle East-North Africa (MENA) region. Scholarship emerging from this region needs to be shared globally, as it will shape how writing centers, writing programs, and WID/WAC initiatives – in the region and outside of it – will respond to the increasing globalization of higher education, as well as to international discussions about World Englishes and other language varieties and translingual approaches to writing and writing pedagogy.

In order to address these needs, the editors seek 300-word chapter proposals for a multi-authored volume, tentatively titled Writing Research and Pedagogy in the MENA Region, for anticipated publication in the Parlor Press/WAC Clearinghouse’s book series, International Exchanges on the Study of Writing.

The editors welcome proposals in English revolving around institutional policies and practices, writing pedagogies, and/or actual writing practice(s) in the MENA region. Proposed chapters should take evidence-based, theoretically grounded approaches with research methods sufficiently articulated and adequate for the research questions. All proposals will be considered; however, the editors are particularly interested in proposals that address any of the following questions:

  • How is writing – in English or in other languages – defined and/or valued in the MENA context? How might these definitions or values be attached to the diverse historical, linguistic, social, political, and/or religious contexts of the MENA region?
  • In the MENA context, where there are often three or more languages or varieties of language to consider, how are conventional notions of L1/L2 complicated in relation to writing practices and pedagogy?
  • What are the unique challenges and benefits faced by writing program and/or writing center administrators in the MENA context?
  • What can be learned about writing pedagogy and/or practice from the student and/or faculty populations at various institutions of higher education in the MENA region?
  • In what ways is the interdisciplinary nature of writing being addressed in the MENA region? How have Writing in the Disciplines (WID) and/or Writing across the Curriculum (WAC) initiatives been implemented and/or received in the MENA region, and what can be learned from the successes and/or failures of these efforts?
  • What can literacy scholars learn about writing practices and pedagogies from research in the MENA region? What new questions about writing arise when considering this regional context, and how might these questions be best addressed/approached by scholars in and outside of the region?
  • What do our answers to the questions above, and our experiences on the ground, suggest about course design, curriculum planning, and/or program development in both international and U.S. contexts?

Submission details:

Deadline for proposals is March 1, 2014 (300 words). Full chapter submissions will be due September 1, 2014 (5,000-6,000 words). Only original work not previously published and not currently under review elsewhere will be considered. Please send your submission to all three of the editors: Lisa Arnold, la66@aub.edu.lb; Anne Nebel, aln27@georgetown.edu; and Lynne Ronesi, lronesi@aus.edu.

PDF version of the CFP

CFP for MENAWCA 2014 Conference

The conference theme is “Sustaining Writing and Writing Centers in the Middle East-North Africa Region.”

As writing centers grow in the MENA region, questions emerge not only about how to sustain and develop them but also about how they can serve as model centers. What strategies can and should regional writing centers adopt in order to establish a solid presence within institutional frameworks? How can peer tutors, international collaborations, local/regional research initiatives drive the momentum? What alliances within or across academic institutions strengthen writing center continuity and support? What technological initiatives, including use of mobile devices, influence our effectiveness with student writers and as we network with other centers? What theories and practices that grow out of local contexts can promote writing center work both within the MENA region and with other local, regional, and international writing forums? This conference aims to identify multi-faceted variables that promote the sustainability of writing programs, writing centers, and most importantly the dialogue between writers.

The MENAWCA invites students, teachers and other professionals who support student writers to its biennial conference, November 7-8, 2014 at the Canadian University in Dubai.

Deadline for Submissions: April 15th, 2014

Continue reading “CFP for MENAWCA 2014 Conference”

Make All Your Research Count on the Research Exchange

The Research Exchange Index (REx) speaks to and expands on Rich Haswell’s call for replicable, aggregable, data-driven research and to our field’s need for more readily available research models and mentors. In addition, REx is a site for both well known and otherwise unpublishedlocal studies conducted over the last ten years: all those studies of tutors and writers for your training; those reports on users and the progress they make that you haven’t published; that study someone else did that you replicated. We want these and published studies entered into our simple check-the-box/short answer form in order to help researchers, teachers, and other writing stakeholders address a wide range of concerns:

  • We have a standing need for access to research and researchers working on issues of shared concern.
  • Many important, even exemplary projects go unpublished, especially projects conducted for local audiences by writing centers, writing programs, or workplace and community groups; these valuable projects can and should be “counted” and aggregated with other studies.
  • Many useful studies by graduate and undergraduate students performed as part of internships, coursework, and thesis projects, are not collected as part of the data that informs our field.
  • Research in schools (K-12) as well as research in different communities and workplaces is often neglected across communities, difficult to find.
  • All research is “international”; we need to collect and connect our studies across borders.

In addressing these and other needs, REx is designed to be more comprehensive than a bibliography of previously published work. And data from studies that led to published work can be entered because REx only asks for quick summaries that will be searchable: you can even highlight your publication by providing a link to it.  REx will serve as a combination roster of active researchers and treasure trove of information about what researchers are studying and why.

We are now soliciting research reports during an initial 18 month collection period, from November 2011 through May 1, 2013. After the collection period closes, REx editors will review contributors’ materials, check facts, and copyedit the database contents to ensure its content searchability. Ultimately, the database along with scholarly essays about its contents will be submitted to an online publisher for review and open access publication. And the next collection period will begin again.

Visit REx now <http://researchexchange.colostate.edu/> and enter at least one past, current, or on-going project!

Call for Chapters: Identity and Leadership in Virtual Communities

I’m very excited to announce this forthcoming anthology from IGI Global, for which I’ll be a co-editor with Dona J. Hickey, the founder of our Writing-Across-the-Curriculum Program at Richmond.

Our full title is “Call for Chapters: Identity and Leadership in Virtual Communities: Establishing Credibility and Influence,” and that could describe much of the networking among writing-center professionals around the world. The book will cover non-academic uses of networked communities as well, and we welcome international submissions.

Read the full call for chapters and description of the book here.

Those interested in submitting a proposal should do so by 31 January; Dona and I will  review proposals in February with an eye toward notifying everyone by the end of the month. Our contact information is at the call for chapters, if you have a proposal ready or any questions.

News from the WAC Clearinghouse

Recently, Mike Palmquist published the following information on the WPA-list and I was thinking it might be of interest also to some of readers of this blog.  /Magnus

I am pleased to announce that two new books series supported by the WAC Clearinghouse are now accepting proposals for manuscripts. These series represent a great deal of generosity of time, effort, and intellectual leadership by their editors, and I hope you’ll join me in thanking them for the contributions to our community. I would also like to call your attention to the Sustainable Publishing Initiative, which the Clearinghouse has launched to explore new approaches to scholarly publishing. The Initiative invites participation, donations, and other forms of support. The two new series and the Initiative are described below.

International Studies of Writing
Series Editors: Terry Myers Zawacki, George Mason University; Magnus Gustafsson, Chalmers University of Technology; Joan Mullin, Illinois State University; and Susan Thomas, University of Sydney

The International Studies of Writing Series publishes book-length manuscripts that address worldwide perspectives on writing, writers, teaching with writing, and scholarly writing practices, specifically those that draw on scholarship across national and disciplinary borders to challenge parochial understandings of all of the above. The series aims to examine writing activities in 21st-century contexts, particularly how they are informed by globalization, national identity, social networking, and increased cross-cultural communication and awareness. As such, the series strives to investigate how both the local and the international inform writing research and the facilitation of writing development. To learn more, visit http://wac.colostate.edu/books/international.cfm.

Excellence in K-12 WAC
Series Editor: Pamela B. Childers, The McCallie School

The Excellence in K-12 WAC Series addresses cross-disciplinary writing studies in K-12. Consistent with the more general Perspectives on Writing Series in its wide-ranging approaches characteristic of teaching and scholarship in writing across the curriculum, this K-12 series will include works that focus on writing in a variety of disciplines, the teaching of writing at the primary, middle or secondary level across disciplines, WAC partnerships, the administration of a WAC program in K-12 schools, and the study of writing in relation to curriculum, ESL, writing/learning centers, NWP, other literacies, or standardized assessments. This recently announced series is now accepting proposals. To learn more, visit http://wac.colostate.edu/books/k12.cfm.

The Sustainable Publishing Initiative
The Initiative is an ambitious effort to study, develop, and assess sustainable alternatives to the scholarly publishing model that has long dominated the production of scholarly books and journals. The goal is of the Initiative to carry out demonstration projects, convene study groups, and consider and test potential new models for scholarly publishing. The first projects associated with the Initiative include the 25 Collective, a project that intends to publish 25 books for a total cash investment of $50,000 or less. To learn more, visit http://wac.colostate.edu/sustain/.

To learn more about these new books series and the Sustainable Publishing Initiative, please visit the WAC Clearinghouse at http://wac.colostate.edu.

 

2013 NEWCA Call for Proposals!

Writing Enriched, Writing Enhanced:
Writing Centers and Writing Across the Curriculum
as Partners and Agents for Change

Call for Proposals – NEWCA 2013
University of New Hampshire
Durham, NH
April 13-14, 2013
Proposals due by January 4, 2013

Keynote Speakers: Susanmarie Harrington & Sue Dinitz, University of Vermont

Call for Proposals
Throughout the Northeast, writing centers are emerging from the Great Recession as leaner and more innovative units. Our realities vary by geography and institutions, but we share a bond of helping writers and learners whose needs often exceed the historical boundaries of English composition and rhetoric courses. We also embrace a common set of values around mentoring writers in ways that help them better understand process, particularly in how meta-awareness creates possibilities to scaffold between assignments, courses and experiences. Writing centers exist as powerful sites from which the competing and complementing demands of discourses, disciplines and conventions become legible and actionable as students move across and within curricula. Writing across the Curriculum Programs, often partners with writing centers, work with students and faculty alike to challenge received ways and genres of writing in the disciplines, to reinvigorate the nexus of writing to learn/learning to write, and to foster awareness of communities of practice and local conventions of expressions. Most importantly, these partners can enact change through vital conversations about teaching, learning, and writing. Continue reading “2013 NEWCA Call for Proposals!”

CFP: Winter 2012 AEQ

Hello All!

The Winter 2012 Issue of Academic Exchange Quarterly is still accepting submissions until the end of August for its special section on Writing Center Theory and Practice.  Articles may explore issues of theory, practice, and experience in writing center work, including qualitative and empirical studies and discussions of pedagogy.

Articles may also consider the following: How writing center professionals cope with change and the eventuality of needing to expand their efforts in response to new economic and demographic challenges.  Furthermore, as we move towards increasingly viral and technologically dependent learning communities, how can these efforts help meet the evolving demands of our students?

In addition to Writing Center Directors and other Administrators, submissions are also welcome from professional staff, faculty tutors, and graduate students who work in the writing center.  Manuscript length should be between 2,000 and 3,000 words.  Please identify your submission with the keyword “Center-2.”

For more information, please visit http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/center2.htm.

Thank you!
K Charron