WLN BLOG UPDATE

Note from the editor

Recently, I shared with the WLN team some snapshots of how our online presence has evolved over the past few years. We quickly decided to pull back the curtain and share some of these with you, as well.

Back in 2013, the blog was reaching a thousand page views or so. Today, we’re on track for 20k page-views, and well over 12k unique visitors. In the past year alone, we’ve had visitors from 124 different countries.

We’ve posted more than 35 times in the past two semesters, from articles on high-school writing centers to discussions about writing centers’ relationship with learning centers, from a review on the movie Arrival to a wonderful roll-out of our first creative writing feature.

Thanks to you, we have a full slate of upcoming articles in development, including profiles of centers in China, an interview with the graduate writing center of CEU in Hungary, a round-up of helpful new software tools and practices, tips for those on the job market, and more. We’re excited for what’s ahead. I’m proud to be part of such a meaningful field!

This past year, I put out a call for more collaborators to join the WLN blog staff, and I’m thrilled that colleagues from all over the world answered. Now, with a great team in place, I’m pleased to hand things off and transition to an advisory role with the blog. Our team includes:

  • Brian Hotson: editor-in-chief, Saint Mary’s University, Canada.
  • Amy Hansen: assistant editor/social media, Appalachian State University, USA.
  • Ann Gardiner: staff writer, Franklin University, Switzerland.
  • Josh Ambrose: consultant/editor emeritus, McDaniel College, USA.

Of course, our most valuable team members are, and always have been, you. And we want to continue hear from you, about the great work you’re doing at your centers, the opportunities and challenges you face, and the new directions ahead. E-mail an editor today with a story tip, and we’ll help you boost the signal—and don’t forget to join the conversations at https://www.facebook.com/wlnjournal and https://twitter.com/wlnjournal.

Gratefully,

Josh Ambrose
McDaniel College

WLN Announcements!

Interested in Joining the WLN Editorial Staff?
Because of an ever-increasing work load and an interest in adding someone with new ideas and approaches to engage our readers, the editorial staff of WLN: A Journal of Writing Center Scholarship is in need of another staff member to join our team for the print journal. We envision this person as being an Associate Editor with some development work as well.

Interested in applying? If so, send us your CV, a short statement about any editorial experience you’ve had, and another short statement about what skills and ideas you would bring to WLN. Also, please let us know if you regularly use email and if you are available to work all year long, including summers.

Please send your CV and the requested additional information to us: Lee Ann Glowzenksi (laglowzenski@gmail.com) and Muriel Harris (harrism@purdue.edu). The position will remain open until filled.

An Invitation to Add Your Voice to WLN Conversations

We recognize that articles in WLN should be two-way conversations between authors and readers. And so, we want to provide space (when we can) in WLN issues to hear from you as readers responding to articles you’ve read in WLN. Because page space is always a problem with any journal trying to stay brief enough to actually allow you to read all articles, please keep your comments brief too. It’s difficult to predict when we will have space to include your responses, but we’ll do our best.

Please send your comments through the submission page on the WLN website.

Join the WLN team!

screen-shot-2016-12-02-at-12-32-25-pmHi all! I’m excited to put out a call for a co-editor at the WLN blog (http://www.wlnjournal.org/blog/). We’ve had a lot of growth over the past few years, and have reached a point where there’s simply more stories out there than I can tell by myself.
I’m looking for someone down-to-earth, who works well with others, and has a natural, friendly inquisitiveness about what other centers around the world are up to. Familiarity with google doc collaboration is a must, as well as a commitment to keeping in touch on a regular basis (goal is to work smart, but stay on top of things). Above all else, ambition and curiosity are welcome!

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A goal of the blog is to continue to grow in our international scope and highlight the awesome work our colleagues are doing, wherever they are. Interested in joining the team? Shoot me an email at JAmbrose@mcdaniel.edu and tell me why you’d want to work on the project, and some of your story/initiative ideas.

Thanks! I look forward to talking more.

Josh Ambrose (aka Prof A)

Director of the McDaniel College Writing Center

phone: 410.857.2420/Hill 102

The History of the WLN: an interview with Dr. Muriel “Mickey” Harris (part two)

Editor’s note: Continuing our previous conversation about the history of the WLN, I asked Dr. Harris to comment on a few other writing center matters, including the history of the Purdue OWL, concerns for the future, and the future of the WLN.

HISTORY OF THE PURDUE OWL

We started the Purdue Writing Lab in 1975 on an experimental basis for a year, and next year, beginning in 1976, it was officially started. But that was long before email or the internet. We developed cabinets full of handouts for students to keep them from taking notes as we talked, and if we took out handouts, we’d mark them up so that they were personalized for the student to take home.

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Somewhere in the 80’s when email came along, I thought we should make those hundreds of handouts available when the Lab wasn’t open, so I managed to scrape bits and pieces of funding to get them up on an automatic system so that students could email a request for a list, then email by number which handouts they wanted (all in ASCII characters, of course), and it would come back immediately.

I don’t know how people all over the world learned about that looooong list of handouts, but we quickly realized thousands of requests were coming in. When Gopher became available, we moved to Gopher, and when web browsers came along, we moved onto the web, all the while watching increasing numbers, so that it quickly jumped to millions of requests from all over the world. It’s still well into the millions.

Continue reading “The History of the WLN: an interview with Dr. Muriel “Mickey” Harris (part two)”

The History of the WLN: an interview with Dr. Muriel “Mickey” Harris

Editor’s note: I asked our fearless leader, Dr. Muriel “Mickey” Harris, to share a bit of history with us, especially for those of us who began directing in the past few years. I’m sure you’ll find Mickey’s responses to be as friendly and informative as I did! Here’s Part One of the conversation (Part Two can be read here.)

IN THE BEGINNING

An informal snapshot of Dr. Muriel "Mickey" Harris
An informal snapshot of Dr. Muriel “Mickey” Harris

The Writing Lab Newsletter began in 1977 as a list of names and addresses gathered after a session at the Conference on College Composition and Composition, in Kansas City, Missouri.

Given that the CCCC planners didn’t expect many people to show up at a session on the little known topic of writing centers, we had a small room in which to gather. But very quickly there was standing room only, and the feeling of delight and amazement was palpable as we all looked around and realized we had colleagues who shared our interest in one-to-one tutoring of writing!

The very first issue!
The very first issue!

As the session ended and people waiting for the next session began filtering in, I grabbed a notepad and asked those who were leaving to sign up, and I’d try to keep us in touch with each other. Needing a name to place at the top of the list, I called it The Writing Lab Newsletter, since “lab” had a “hands on, anything goes” connotation that we liked.

Continue reading “The History of the WLN: an interview with Dr. Muriel “Mickey” Harris”

Call for Blog Editor

 

Call for a Blog Editor

for “Connecting Writing Centers Across Borders”

The Writing Lab Newsletter (which will become WLN: A Journal of Writing Center Scholarship, beginning with vol. 40, the Sept. 2015 issue) is looking for an editor for the Connecting Writing Centers Across Borders (CWCAB) blog. CWCAB, as the name implies, is an international blog with a goal of fostering communication between people in all countries and on all continents who are engaged in writing center work. It’s a space for writing center professionals and tutors working mostly outside the United States to chat, exchange ideas and photos, post announcements, and/or ask questions. The CWCAB Editor will be responsible for encouraging and500 registered users, to new audiences.

This position requires no technical knowledge or previous work with blogs. WLN hosts the blog, and experienced staffers can help with any technological questions.

If you are interested, please send a short statement aboutwriting centers in various countries to both of the following people:

• Alan Benson: mail to:BENSONAT@uwec.edu

    and

• Muriel Harris: mail to: :harrism@purdue.edu