Our new WLN Blog co-editors: Ann Gardiner and Brian Hotson

This week’s post is an introduction of our new co-editors, Ann Gardiner, Director of the Writing and Learning Center at Franklin University Switzerland and Brian Hotson, Director of Student Academic Learning Services in the Studio for Teaching and Learning at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, Canada. In their conversation below, they speak to their own experiences coming to writing centers, their own practices in academic writing, and their outlook for the blog. You can contact Ann (agardiner@fus.edu) and Brian (brian.hotson@smu.ca) with any ideas for the blog.

Ann Gardiner

Q:    How did you arrive at your current position?
Ann: To make a long story short, I would say that I went through several side doors to arrive at my current position at Franklin University Switzerland, where I have been Director of the Writing and Learning Center since 2010. With a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature, I started my academic career as a professor, but I always worked closely with writing centers and even created one during my first academic appointment in Germany. In a sense, I became a specialist in general education courses, and I found that I really enjoyed helping students how to write better, read better, think better. In my two previous teaching appointments prior to coming to Franklin, I regularly taught writing and was teaching writing courses at Franklin as an adjunct when my predecessor at the Writing and Learning Center took an extended maternity leave. The replacement position became a permanent position in 2010, and I have been happily here ever since.

Brian Hotson

Brian: Unlike Anne, I started outside academia before my first writing centre position in 2008 at the writing centre at Queen’s University in Kingston (Ontario). I worked for many years in academic publishing, as a writer, project manager, and editor, among other things, mainly for Nelson Education. I also spent ten years as a writer and director/producer in educational television. Writing centre work came as a suggestion to me from a friend: I needed a job while completing my Master’s. We moved our family to Halifax in 2009, and in 2010, the directorship of the centre at Saint Mary’s University came available. It seems to really bring together my working skills and experience together.

Q:    What do you like best about working in writing centres?
Brian: Students and sentences. I spend a lot of time thinking about both. I like getting to know the students as a person–when I can–what they want to do academically, as well as how they’re going to take all their experiences and knowledge away with them. There’s great satisfactions to witness a student’s progress in, through, and out of the school. It’s humbling and satisfying!

Ann: As Director of the Writing and Learning Center, I have also gotten to know my tutors well too. Like Brian, I find it extremely rewarding to watch a student or tutor progress. I regularly have fantastic discussions with my students, tutors and academic mentors, who are upper-level students who help professors in their first year seminar courses and whose training I help coordinate. As I mentioned, I really enjoy helping students become better learners, and there is never a dull moment with this endeavor. We are a very small school at Franklin with about 400 students, and as a result I know my students well.

Continue reading “Our new WLN Blog co-editors: Ann Gardiner and Brian Hotson”

Call for Submissions: Creative Writing/Center

Amy Hansen is the assistant director of the Appalachian State University Writing Center and a recent graduate of the MFA program in creative writing at Northern Michigan University. She’s joining the CWCAB blog team as a staff writer–and has a great first project!

For my first project at CWCAB, I’d like to solicit and share the creative writing of writing center tutors and administrators here on the blog. I’d love to read poetry and short non-fiction/fiction pieces about writing center work, but I’m just as interested in creative work that’s more abstractly inspired by the practice and pedagogy of tutoring writing. Maybe you have a poem inspired by an interaction with a student in the writing center. Maybe you wrote a reflective profile of yourself as a tutor. Maybe (fingers crossed!) you composed the first writing center rock opera. Whatever it is, however you got there from writing center studies, we want to read it.

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Conference announcement! “Directions in Academic Writing: Issues and Solutions”

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Last year’s conference team

The Ninth Symposium on Writing Centers in Asia will be held on ​March 6, 2017 at International Christian University in Tokyo.

​The theme this year is ​Directions in Academic Writing: Issues and Solutions.

This symposium provides opportunities for scholars, teachers, students, university administrators, and other professionals to come together to exchange ideas about the role of writing centers in Asian universities as well as the teaching and learning of writing. We welcome a diverse group of participants and presenters from a variety of contexts to join us.

For more details, registration and proposals for papers click here 

Join the WLN team!

screen-shot-2016-12-02-at-12-32-25-pmHi all! I’m excited to put out a call for a co-editor at the WLN blog (http://www.wlnjournal.org/blog/). We’ve had a lot of growth over the past few years, and have reached a point where there’s simply more stories out there than I can tell by myself.
I’m looking for someone down-to-earth, who works well with others, and has a natural, friendly inquisitiveness about what other centers around the world are up to. Familiarity with google doc collaboration is a must, as well as a commitment to keeping in touch on a regular basis (goal is to work smart, but stay on top of things). Above all else, ambition and curiosity are welcome!

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A goal of the blog is to continue to grow in our international scope and highlight the awesome work our colleagues are doing, wherever they are. Interested in joining the team? Shoot me an email at JAmbrose@mcdaniel.edu and tell me why you’d want to work on the project, and some of your story/initiative ideas.

Thanks! I look forward to talking more.

Josh Ambrose (aka Prof A)

Director of the McDaniel College Writing Center

phone: 410.857.2420/Hill 102

Honoring Mary Jo Turley

A note from our editor in chief, Dr. Mickey Harris:

turleyIn its earlier incarnation as the Writing Lab Newsletter, the publication was put out through Purdue University, until Purdue ended its connection. But during that time, some of you who subscribed to WLN and/or sent in submissions for possible publication may have interacted with Mary Jo Turley, our secretary, who handled subscriptions, manuscripts, etc. I was saddened to learn that Mary Jo passed away in a traffic accident earlier this month. And while I don’t like to be the bearer of such sad news, I realize that some of you may want to join me in honoring the memory of a truly good woman whose humanity and grace—and sly humor—were constantly present in her work.

After Mary Jo and I both retired, we’d meet around town and always vow that we’d have lunch together soon, but that didn’t happen as often as it should have. Such a reminder of our mortality as well as the need to appreciate people around us—those whom we work with, whom we personally enjoy being with, and whom we depend on to keep on doing the great work that they do.

Introducing the Online Writing Centers (OWC) Email Discussion List

sarah_princeToday’s post comes courtesy of Dr. Sarah Prince, of Walden University. Together with Beth Nastachowski, MA, Dr. Prince is starting a new discussion group–the OWC email discussion list. Today’s post is about the OWC–stay tuned for part two, coming next week, about best practices for online centers!

The idea for the listserv grew out of a SIG we presented at the 2015 IWCA conference titled “Refocusing the Conversation: Creating Spaces for Online Writing Center Community, Support, and Discussion.” After talking through possibilities for community building during the SIG, many ideas were on the table—an annual conference and/or a possible affiliation group within IWCA (much like the current regional affiliations rooted in specific geographic locations). Post conference, to follow up with these ideas, we sent out a survey to all who attended the conference and others at the conference who signed up to receive more information. Based on the group’s voting, it was decided that we would initially start with a listserv, or discussion list, to promote communication about what centers are doing and how we could all better serve students in a fully-online capacity.

Please join us today at the Online Writing Centers (OWC) email discussion list!

We hope that this listserv does in fact start as a building block that generates wider conversations about the state of current online writing centers, common issues among fully online centers, and possibilities for future collaboration among these centers. We would love to see our group gain the support and membership to work toward a separate affiliation under IWCA one day or even create an academic conference around issues specific to tutoring writing in a virtual environment.

We are advocating for further conversations among staff and tutors that serve students online, so we can, as a group, come up with best practices. Because such a community is still in its infancy, perhaps a better discussion would be how we’ve come to the practices that work for our center– through trial and error, gaps we perceived in our services, ideas for conveying information about writing in new ways, etc. In other words, we can talk about how we have a lot of this stuff, in part, because we don’t really have many discipline-wide best practices and, consequently, we’ve had to experiment. Our guess is that other centers are in the same boat, so we’d like to really advocate for a space where important discussions on innovation and new technologies can take place.

Continue reading “Introducing the Online Writing Centers (OWC) Email Discussion List”

The University of British Columbia Writing Centre Faces Closure

Screen Shot 2016-03-19 at 4.50.48 PMThe University of British Columbia is facing a shut-down of the face-to-face services of their popular writing centre. According to reporting from Samantha McCabe in the student newspaper, The Ubyssey, “Tutors believe that it is due to financial issues facing the Writing Centre, but this has not been confirmed by the university administration.”

Tutors and staff are pushing back against the pending decision and have started an online petition, which states, “Without the Writing Centre’s free tutoring services, the university’s reputation for academic excellence and educational accessibility will no longer be secure-and that is why we, as concerned students and Writing Centre tutors, have put forth this petition as a call for action. We need to save the Writing Centre’s tutoring services.”

To lend your support, sign the petition today!

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Listserv Misgivings and the WcORD

Screen Shot 2016-03-17 at 8.25.38 AMThis blog post is courtesy of Patrick Hargon, the Associate Director of the Learning Commons at the University of Nebraska at Kearney. 

If you haven’t checked out the Writing Center Online Research Database, enter a term in the search field at this link. It is like a micro-Google just for writing centers. You can find annotated exchanges from WCenter, links to writing center websites with all of the handouts and videos and resources so many have created, links to journal articles, blogs, podcasts, etc.

Perhaps its most useful function, for me, is that it offers a new site to check whenever I get the feeling that I want to post a question to the WCenter listserv.

Last Friday, as UNK’s Learning Commons neared closing time, I pulled one of our writing tutors aside and asked her to tutor me. She said she would, but I couldn’t judge her. “That’s got to go both ways,” I said, knowing that I was about to drag her into a house of mirrors: I wanted to send a question to the WCenter listserv, and I just needed to verbally release, like static electric discharge, all of the misgivings I cycle through beforehand. Should I this, should I that? Should I not? No, I should not. Okay, just do the thing. Hit send.

I’ve never been browbeaten on a listserv, I’ve never sent a message and lost sleep over it (I haven’t hit “Reply-all” by accident yet), and I’ve never come up with a single rational reason to go through the anxious protocol of searching the archives, writing, deleting, searching the archives again, rewriting, thinking, overthinking, finishing, almost sending, rethinking, etc., before simply hitting send. Furthermore, WCenter has an admirable record for polite responses to questions that have been asked many times before.

The tutor and I looked over recent posts to assess the tone of the salutations, to look at folks’ preferred sign-offs, to just get a feel for the different intonations of queries. We didn’t come up with a coding or classification system or anything, so I have nothing to report from our findings. But it was fun.

After that, she asked, “What are you worried about?”

“Well, creating an international wave of eyerolls throughout higher education,” I said.

She said, “Seriously, what’s the worst thing that could happen?”
Continue reading “Listserv Misgivings and the WcORD”

“Reading in the Writing Center” CFP: Special Issue of WLN

carillo_e-150x150Guest editor Ellen C. Carillo is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Connecticut and the Writing Program Coordinator at its Waterbury Campus. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in composition and literature, and is the author of Securing a Place for Reading in Composition: The Importance of Teaching for Transfer (Utah State UP, 2015). Her scholarship has been published in WLN; Rhetoric Review; Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture; Reader: Essays in Reader-Oriented Theory, Criticism, and Pedagogy; Feminist Teacher; Currents in Teaching and Learning; and in several edited collections. Ellen is co-founder of the Role of Reading in Composition Studies Special Interest Group of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) and has presented her scholarship at many conferences including IWCA, CCCC, and MLA. She was recently awarded a research grant from CWPA for a project on transfer in writing centers.

Prior to a 2012 change in the Conference on College Composition and Communication’s (CCCC) call for proposals, Mariolina Salvatori and Patricia Donahue found that it had been almost two decades since composition’s professional organization encouraged panels and presentations on reading at their annual convention. Despite the long silence surrounding reading in composition, in the last five years or so many compositionists have returned to crucial questions related to reading, writing’s counterpart in the construction of meaning. For example, compositionists have been conducting studies that explore how instructors attend to reading in first-year writing courses (Bunn) and how focusing on reading early in students’ academic careers can affect their success in their majors (Lockhart and Soliday). Others seek to expose the false print-digital binary that overemphasizes the differences between print-based and digital reading (Horning; Morris).

Because writing centers are rich interdisciplinary sites that challenge both physical and conceptual boundaries among disciplines and between novices and experts, writing center studies is positioned to expand current discussions about reading. Writing center professionals’ perspectives have the potential to enrich these theoretical discussions, and their work on the ground has the potential to support more comprehensive literacy tutoring. Still, writing center studies has yet to join the conversation.

Continue reading ““Reading in the Writing Center” CFP: Special Issue of WLN”

CFP–Symposium on Writing Centers in Asia

The Eighth Symposium on Writing Centers in Asia will be held on Saturday, March 5, 2016, in Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan. It will be hosted this year by Tsuda College in conjunction with the Writing Centers Association of Japan (WCAJ) and the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS). The theme this year is Writing Centers Across Languages and Cultures.

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While many writing centers in Japan started as university programs that either taught English as a foreign language or offered degree programs taught in English, recently more universities in Japan have been setting up writing centers to help students write in Japanese, either as a second language or, more often, as their first language. Tsuda College started its Japanese writing center in 2008, being one of the pioneers in Japan, and added sessions for English writing in 2013. Although the methodologies and approaches for conducting Japanese sessions are similar to those in English, we wonder if the role of the writing centers changes in different languages and cultures. This is one of the interesting questions we would like to explore in this symposium.

Continue reading “CFP–Symposium on Writing Centers in Asia”

Meet MENAWCA

Editor’s note: I was excited when Kelly Wilson of the Texas A&M University in Qatar agreed to share more with us about the Middle East – North Africa Writing Centers Alliance. Read about their valuable work below!

2014 MENAWCA Conference
2014 MENAWCA Conference

MENAWCA (Middle East – North Africa Writing Centers Alliance) was founded in 2007 to foster communication among existing writing centers in the region and to promote the work/practice/pedagogy of WCs in hopes that other institutions would be interested in starting them. Currently, our board has nine members.

I serve as President. My term began in May 2015 when the president at the time learned that she would be leaving the region. The expat world can be quite transient and some of us come and go without much notice. But, I was happy to take the role on as I love writing center work and I see it as an opportunity not only to serve the field, but to learn and develop new skills. My term will end in March 2017.

I have worked at Texas A&M University at Qatar (TAMUQ) for 5 years, both as a writing consultant and now as the Program Coordinator of Tutorial Services in our Academic Success Center. I oversee the training and supervision of tutors for writing as well as some math and sciene courses. TAMUQ is an engineering college – we offer bachelor’s degrees in mechanical, electrical and computing, petroleum and chemical engineering. We also offer an MEng or MS in chemical engineering.

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The remainder of the members on the MENAWCA Executive Board are as follows:

  • Vice President: Maimoonah Al Khalil (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia)
  • Past President: Molly McHarg (Washington DC)
  • Secretary: Elizabeth Whitehouse (Al Ain, UAE)
  • Treasurer/IWCA Representative: Sherry Ward (Doha, Qatar)
  • Public Relations Officer: Paula Habre (Beirut, Lebanon)
  • Conference Co-Chairs: Ryan McDonald and Susan Finlay (Muscat, Oman)
  • Webmaster: Amy Zenger (Beirut, Lebanon)
  • Member at Large: Jodi Lefort (Muscat, Oman)

Continue reading “Meet MENAWCA”

#IntlWriteIn 2015

Editor’s note: Jill Gladstein shares an update on the always growing #IntlWriteIn event!

At this moment, there are 88 schools from 5 countries set to host an international write-in event between Dec. 1-10. The current list of schools is below. Some are hosting an event for the first time while others are old pros at this point. The Swarthmore folks will do our best to keep tabs on how things unfold via social media, but others should feel free to help out to create a buzz. We have adopted the hashtag #intlwritein. If you use this hashtag on any social media platform, the event tagboard should pick it up.  You don’t need to be hosting an event to use the hashtag. Feel free to add to the buzz by sharing a scene from your writing center.

I can’t wait to see how this event unfolds on the different campuses. We know that schools have adjusted the event to fit their campus, which is what matters most. If we can get the event buzzing on social media, that’s a bonus. I like to think of the social media buzz as getting the wave moving around a stadium. It’s exciting if and when it happens, but the success of the wave shouldn’t impact the game on the field.

Be well,

Jill

 

Continue reading “#IntlWriteIn 2015”

WLN News Round-Up

Assistant blog editor, Amber Slater, shares some of what’s on the WLN news radar this week:

Why do writers love to run? Nick Ripatrazone explores the parallels between writing and running, aiming to explain why so many famous authors have been known to hit the track or the trails. [The Atlantic]

From CBC
From CBC

College students offer tutoring to Syrian refugees. Using Skype, a group of students from McGill University is offering English language tutoring to Syrian refugees who are studying for the TOEFL exam. While it is currently a pilot project, the students hope to involve more of their peers and spread awareness about the refugee crisis. [CBC]

 

A PhD student explains the utility of writing groups. Travis Grandy explains the personal benefits of writing groups and offers tips about how they can be structured and planned. [Inside Higher Ed]

A youth writing center will be recognized by the White House. The center, the Telling Room, is based out of Portland, Maine and offers writing programs for refugee and immigrant high school students. The organization will receive a National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award of $10,000 to expand its programming. [MPBN]

Watch a video about the Telling Room here:

What writing and tutoring-related news do you have to share with us this week? Let us know in the comments!

WLN News Round-Up

Assistant blog editor, Amber Slater, shares some of what’s on the WLN news radar this week:

Students provide NANOWRIMO tutoring. Utah State University Writing Center tutors are currently staffing a community writing center that is offering resources to writers completing the National Novel Writing Month (NANOWRIMO) challenge, in which participants write a 50,000 word novel during the month of November. [HJNews]

From New York Times
From New York Times

Poetry goes viral on Instagram. Poets are building readership by publishing  on Instagram and Tumblr. For some, this online popularity leads to mainstream publishing deals. My question is: How can writing centers best support writers who are publishing their work through Instagram and blogging platforms? [New York Times]

 

An NCPTW discussion continues. At the National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing (NCPTW), the presenters of “(De)Centering Stories about Teaching and Tutoring: A Narrative Round Table” have shared a Google doc with their stories about navigating the duality of working in a writing center and teaching composition as graduate students. They have invited other writing center professionals who have experienced duality in their writing center roles to share their stories on the doc as well.

What writing & tutoring-related news have you been reading this week? Let us know in the comments!

WLN News Round-Up!

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAJSAAAAJDRlYmEzZmUxLTFjMjItNGUwOS04MGY0LTNiNTEyNTJhMjU3NgHello! My name is Amber Slater, and I’m a peer tutor and Graduate Assistant at DePaul’s University Center for Writing-based Learning. I’ll be foraging the web for writing center-related happenings and sharing them here. Stay tuned!

November is National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo! Writers who sign up pledge to write a 50,000 word novel between November 1 and November 30. Michigan State University consultant Caitlin Munch discusses why anyone, even people with busy schedules, should sign up for NaNoWriMo. [MSU]

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Visual art and writing collide. The University of Southern California Writing Center has transformed its space into an art gallery. The works were submitted by student artists and reflect scenes from novels such as J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye and Colum McCann’s Let the Great World Spin. Stay tuned for a CWCAB interview about this, soon! [USCDornsife]

The National Census on Writing has been released! Carl Straumsheim summarizes and highlights major findings of the National Census on Writing, which collected data from over 900 two- and four-year institutions. [Inside Higher Ed]

From NPR

Robo-tutors? A company called Knewton has created a “mind-reading robo-tutor” that uses cloud-based data to determine students’ strengths and weaknesses and provide personalized tutoring sessions. The reception so far has been mixed, and the product is currently aimed at K-12 education. My questions is: Is it time for Writing Centers to harness this type of technology? [NPR]

What kind of news would you like to see on the WLN News Round-Up? Let me know in the comments!

CFP: Special Issue of WLN–The Work of the Writing Center Director

Mueller-SusanSusan Mueller has been the Writing Center Director at the St. Louis College of Pharmacy since 2003, where she also teaches first year writing courses and literature courses. Her work has appeared in WLN and in PRAXIS:  A Writing Center Journal. Susan has often presented at MWCA and and IWCA, particularly on tutor training and on the intersections of WAC and writing centers. 

JAutengifphotoJanet G. Auten was the associate editor of WLN for seven years. She directs the Writing Center and teaches the graduate seminar in composition pedagogy in the Department of Literature at American University. Current research and publication center on pedagogy education, teaching information literacy, and the work of literacy narratives in both of those contexts. Her recent work has appeared in Composition Studies, Praxis: A Writing Center Journal, and Teaching and Learning Inquiry, and in many presentations for 4C’s, IWCA, and MAWCA. 

As recent discussions on WCenter demonstrate, the way writing center directors and writing centers are perceived outside our walls is critical to our survival and growth both as organizations and as vital components of our schools. Yet these perceptions are often determined by fleeting, incomplete, and/or too-often inaccurate impressions of what we do rather than conclusions based on solid facts. Our daily work is important and influences our students and tutors beyond our writing centers. What tools do we have at our disposal that can provide our stakeholders with accurate information about our professional stature, our gravitas as members of the academy, and our status? What substantive evidence of our value and importance, both to our students’ success and to our institutions themselves, is available for us to present and promote?

For this special issue on “The Work of the Writing Center Director,” we invite proposals, of 300-350 words, for articles up to 3000 words (including Works Cited) that consider the broader impact of our work and the specific mechanisms available to us for establishing value in the eyes of those who matter—administrators, faculty, staff (such as advisors, student success coordinators, and others who matter), and students. Proposals should also identify how those mechanisms will enable directors to convey that information to stakeholders in light of local politics.

Continue reading “CFP: Special Issue of WLN–The Work of the Writing Center Director”

CFP: Sharing Common Ground? Writing Centers and Learning Commons

Guest Editors: Hillory Oakes and Steven J. Corbett for the WLN Journal

As schools look to develop students as sophisticated communicators across disciplines and media, more and more writing centers are becoming—or considering becoming—part of multiliteracy-focused learning commons enterprises (Koehler; Deans and Roby). In fact, the success of writing center programming has on many campuses contributed to the emergence of the learning commons model. Writing center directors and tutors have a wealth of knowledge to bring to these endeavors: we are natural collaborators and have developed skills and practices that put us in a perfect position to lead conversations about the learning commons at our institutions (Harris, “Preparing”; Lunsford and Ede).

11800171_902887463119022_7738110525106617949_nStill, the history of our field has taught us that we must pay attention to names and titles, definitions of purpose and mission statements, institutional hierarchies and physical locations (Macauley and Mauriello; Mauriello, Macauley, and Koch; McKinney; Salem). These are not niceties but necessities for developing successful programs. Just as defining what a writing center is and is not has historically been problematic (Boquet and Lerner; Lerner; McKinney; Corbett), the definition of “learning commons” currently varies widely between institutions (Oblinger) and at times revisits all-too-familiar territory. For example, writing centers have long rejected being cast as “fix-it shops,” yet now it is common for the learning commons to be touted as a place for “one-stop shopping.”

Continue reading “CFP: Sharing Common Ground? Writing Centers and Learning Commons”

2015 Peer Tutor Day: Tutors around the Globe

Nijmegen 1Friday July 10th and Saturday July 11th, Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands

The Nijmegen Centre for Academic Writing would like to invite tutors working at writing centres all over the world for an EWCA peer tutor event this summer. Last year, our tutors were very inspired by the exchange with international colleagues at the EWCA Peer Tutor Day in Frankfurt/Oder. Unfortunately, no Peer Tutor Day was planned for this summer, which would mean that many of our tutors would not have the opportunity to meet with other (foreign) colleagues to exchange ideas. That is why we decided to host the 2015 Peer Tutor Day in Nijmegen!

Continue reading “2015 Peer Tutor Day: Tutors around the Globe”

WcORD goes public!

Ever feel like the same questions get asked on the listservs and Facebook groups again and again?

Looking for examples of writing center videos?

What articles to read about training programs?

Links to regional writing center groups?

There’s a new solution for that!

The WLN is pleased to announce that WCORD: The Writing Center Online Resource Database is now LIVE.

Associate editor Lee Ann Glowzenski, a key architect of the archive, shares that “WcORD is a community project, and we’re depending on users to help the database to grow. We’d love to see the addition of writing center websites and blogs, links to articles and handouts, videos and multimedia presentations — any and all resources that writing center practitioners and researchers use in their everyday work.”

Mickey Harris agrees. “Join on in! Enter the online resources they have for their centers or that they know about (including the URLs for their WCA organizations). Together, we can make this an invaluable resource for our community.”

Explore and bookmark the WcORD today!

A Call to Reflect On Lerner’s Bean Counting

Given the drumbeat about the need for assessment, we’re asking for your thoughts on Neal Lerner’s “Counting Beans and Making Beans Count,” Vol. 22.1 (September 1997), and if appropriate to what is on your mind, also his later “Choosing Beans Wisely” Vol. 26.1 (September, 2001). Both articles are available in the open access Archives on the WLN website. We look forward to reading your thoughts about this topic and sharing them with other WLN readers.

Please send your reflection through the Submission section on our website.

Other Reflection Opportunities

As part of our 40th anniversary celebration of the Writing Lab Newsletter (scheduled to become WLN: A Journal of Writing Center Scholarship with the beginning of Vol. 40 in Sept.), we also extend a broader invitation for you to reflect on an article that has appeared at some point during all those years. How has some particular article influenced writing center scholarship and work? How has this topic changed directions since the time in which it was written? Why? What relevance does the article have?

Continue reading “A Call to Reflect On Lerner’s Bean Counting”