WLN News Round-Up: September 2016

Here is some of what has been on the WLN news radar lately:

“How to Write Like an Olympian”– In reflecting on the summer Olympics, Shira Lurie draws parallels between writing and athletics and shares tips for graduate students to write at their highest level.  [Inside Higher Ed]

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“Gender-Neutral Pronoun Usage in Academic Writing”– This article discusses the importance of avoiding gender bias in academic writing and offers advice on using singular they. [UofL Writing Center]

What do adult students want from college?“- Did you know that over 40% of college students are over 25 years old? This article explores the needs of adult college students. Let us know in the comments if your writing centers have initiatives for adult students!  [Christian Science Monitor]

“College Graduates Weigh In On the Value of Higher Education”– Read or listen to quotes from recently graduated students who chose public, private, and community college experiences. [NPR]

“You Can Write Your Way Out of an Emotional Funk. Here’s How.”– This article reminds us of the therapeutic powers of writing and gives tips on how you can use writing to lift your mood and escape a funk. [NYMag]

Interview with Dana McLachlin from the Asian University for Women

Screen Shot 2016-08-15 at 10.04.28 AMIn today’s interview, Dana McLachlin, Coordinator of the Writing Center at the Asian University for Women in Chittagong, Bangladesh, discusses the focus of AUW and how the writing center meets student needs.

Hi Dana! Can you tell us about the mission of Asian University for Women (AUW) and the student population?

AUW is a unique institution in many ways: we’re a liberal arts college for women in Chittagong, Bangladesh, and our students come from over 15 countries across Asia, including Afghanistan, Vietnam, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, and Syria. AUW’s mission is to graduate service-oriented leaders who will collaborate across cultural, ethnic, and religious divisions to address social and political problems. Our liberal arts curriculum thus requires courses in Social Analysis and Ethical Reasoning to cultivate critical thinking and civic and political responsibility; our residential program and extracurricular activities also promote friendship and cooperation among students. Our mission is also to expand access to higher education for women, thus the majority of our students are the first women from their families to attend higher education, and most receive full scholarships to study.

How did you get involved with the AUW writing center? What was your experience with writing center work before AUW?

I originally worked as a writing tutor at the University of Richmond, in Richmond, Virginia in the United States. At UR, most of my writing tutoring was classroom-specific rather than in a center. I worked with a specific professor for first-year writing seminars, and gave written feedback in addition to meeting with students.

When researching postgraduate opportunities, I found out about AUW online, and jumped at the chance to live in Bangladesh and work at a women’s university. While I enjoyed writing tutoring at Richmond, I began to really love writing center work at AUW, largely because of our unique student body and context. Working with many students in different classes is also a unique challenge compared to being a class-specific tutor, where you may know the assignment and content well.  

dsc_1713What does a typical day look like at the AUW Writing Center?

As with almost any office in Bangladesh, a typical day at the writing center involves many cups of tea and lots of conversation! We’re open 10:30-6:00 weekdays as well as Saturday afternoons (the second day of the weekend in Bangladesh). We normally start the day relatively quiet, but by the afternoon we’re busy with tutors and students coming in and out, and lots of chatting by the front desk. We’re really lucky to have a group of dedicated work-study students, who serve as peer tutors and administrative assistants. They are the lifeblood of the center and keep everything running smoothly, welcoming people as they walk in and creating a friendly atmosphere. We also have a group of staff (in the past AUW fellows and WorldTeach Volunteers) who do the bulk of our tutoring; they also run workshops and IELTS/GRE courses for students preparing for graduate school.

Continue reading “Interview with Dana McLachlin from the Asian University for Women”

Call for Submissions: Digital Resource Toolkit for Secondary School Writing Center Directors

 

Screen Shot 2016-08-15 at 11.15.11 AMPriority Submission Date: August 15, 2016 (priority), September 15, 2016 (regular)

Contact Amber Jensen, President of the Capital Area Peer Tutoring Association, at capta.connects@gmail.com with questions. The call for submissions is as follows:

 

We invite secondary school writing center directors to contribute to an exciting, updated, an digital new version of the Capital Area Peer Tutoring Association’s Resource Toolkit for Secondary School Writing Center Directors.

The first versions of this resource, assembled in 2011 and 2012 by a team of four SSWC directors in Northern Virginia, were designed to support new SSWC directors by sharing artifacts from our centers and exemplars of the kinds of documents and materials we created to support our work and our tutors’ work. More than a theory-­based description of writing center pedagogy (which has been widely published elsewhere), we envisioned this resource as a toolkit, which is what we named it, with practical examples, accompanied by explanations, of various documents and materials throughout the phases of establishing and maintaining our writing centers.

For the past five years, distribution of this resource has been in high demand, but unfortunately limited due to printing and shipping costs. This summer, with funding from George Mason University, we are developing a new digital edition of the toolkit which will be distributed this fall; it will be available in PDF and e­book formats, and we plan to make it downloadable for free. Not only does a digital edition allow for wider and more equitable distribution of the materials, but it also allows for more frequent revisions and updates, which is very exciting.

We are reaching out to the wider community of SSWC directors to invite your contributions to this resource. We invite you to consider the kinds of documents and products you are willing to share with other SSWC directors, including materials you have designed as a program administrator for tutors, teachers, administrators, and other audiences. These artifacts might fit into any of the following categories (described more in detail here ):

  1. Planning and Proposal (planning documents, committee descriptions and roles, proposed budgets, administrative proposals, three­ or five­ year plans, etc.)
  2. Tutor Recruitment and Selection (nomination letters, tutor application materials, tutor selection criteria, selection committee roles, interview materials, etc.)
  3. Initial Tutor Training (training agendas, resource lists, materials designed for tutors to learn about tutoring and/or writing, etc.)
  4. Program Implementation (informational flyers or advertisements, teacher­ or tutor­created PSAs for students, teachers, administrators, methods for keeping records on tutoring sessions, tutor reflection logs, tutor evaluation mechanisms, administration meeting agendas, etc.)
  5. Tutor Course Curriculum (syllabi for tutor training courses, writing assignments for tutors, assessment criteria, etc.)
  6. School­wide Writing Initiatives (partnership programs with departments, clubs, activities in the schools, special workshops or outreach initiatives, etc.)
  7. Gathering Evidence of Success: Data and Evaluation (monthly reports, quantitative and/or qualitative data on tutoring, etc.)

Continue reading “Call for Submissions: Digital Resource Toolkit for Secondary School Writing Center Directors”

WLN News Round-Up: August 2016

Here is some of what has been on the WLN news radar lately:

“A life in review: Writing tasks that academics do that we don’t talk about”– Sue Starfield, Director of the Learning Centre at UNSW Australia, explores genre conventions that academics utilize, but don’t often discuss or teach. [Doctoral Writing SIG]

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“Ditch Writing Stress Through Journaling”– Matt Baker from the University of Nevada, Reno writing center discusses the benefits of keeping a journal and where journaling falls within the writing process. [University of Nevada, Reno]

“Everyone Loves a Slinky”– Brodie Willard from Texas A&M University writing center discusses a tutoring session where using toys helped communicate feedback to a writer. [Peer Centered]

“Four Resolutions for the New Semester”– David Gooblar lays out four goals for his teaching  practice. What are your resolutions for the upcoming academic year? Let us know in the comments! [Vitae]

“Transfer of Learning in the Writing Center” CFP: Special Issue of WLN

Guest Editors: Dana Lynn Driscoll (Indiana University of Pennsylvania) and Bonnie Devet (College of Charleston)

A vital topic in higher education is transfer of learning, or what is generally known as students’ ability to adapt, apply, or remix prior knowledge and skills in new contexts, including educational, civic, personal, and professional.  As recent writing center scholarship attests, transfer of learning is of key importance to the work we do in writing centers, both with our work with clients but also with our tutors themselves.

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For this special issue of the WLN, we encourage contributors to consider, as starting points, some of the following questions related to transfer and centers:

  • How might transfer be defined and considered in a writing center context?
  • How does transfer help characterize the development of consultants, both novice and expert?
  • How do consultants transfer knowledge between settings?
  • What strategies can consultants use to support and encourage clients’ transfer of prior knowledge and skills during sessions?
  • How do clients use the writing center to transfer writing knowledge between courses?
  • What role do dispositions play in transfer in a writing center context?
  • What can writing center directors do to help prepare tutors to better support transfer?
  • How can transfer of learning be a primary mission for writing centers?

Continue reading ““Transfer of Learning in the Writing Center” CFP: Special Issue of WLN”

WLN News Round-Up for the Month of July

Here’s some of what has been on the WLN news radar lately:

“What does OWL mean to you?: Creating New Web-Based Resources for the Writing Center”– This post explores the process of making an online writing workshop about literature reviews, especially focusing on making it interactive using the program Zaption. [UofL Writing Center]

“From the CanLit Guides Workshop to the Writing Centre: Using Think-Aloud Protocol as a Tool for Peer Review”– This entry explains the think-aloud protocol and explains how it was applied in a dissertation bootcamp. [University of Waterloo]

“The (Ghost) Writer in the Machine”– This interview with Matthew G. Kirschenbaum, author of the new book Track Changes: A Literary History of Word Processing, discusses the relationship between writers and writing technology. [The Chronicle of Higher Education]

“WriteCast: Favorite Apps to Save You Time While You Write”– This podcast episode from Walden University shares apps that student writers can use to aid in the writing process. Take a listen below:

WLN News Round-Up for the Month of June

Here’s some of what has been on the WLN news radar lately:

“Managing an anxiety disorder in higher ed is a full time job”- This author discusses their generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and anxiety-provoking assumptions (APAs) in terms of how they directly relate to a career in academia, as well as personal anxiety management techniques that they use. [The Guardian]

“From Learning Commons to Learning Communities”- This article from the American Society for Interior Designers explores how learning spaces can be designed to best fit millennial learners. In particular, the author discusses a “mixed-use learning zone” at the University of Florida. Does anyone have a writing center designed in this way? Let us know in the comments! [Icon]

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“Why Mentoring Others Has Helped Me”- This post discusses how mentorship can be beneficial not just to mentees, but also to mentors. In relation to writing center work, this sentence stood out:

“One wonderful benefit of working with younger students or professionals is that they were more recently in school, and can help keep you current with the latest information, best practices, and new techniques in your industry.”

Within our centers, it is key to consider how tutors can assist in the decision making process when it comes to tutoring techniques and practices, as well as choosing which technologies to use! [Huffington Post]

“Summer Reading List”– As the school year winds down for many of us, we turn to a hobby that often gets neglected during the school year: reading for fun! In this post, Inside Higher Ed contributors share what they’ve been reading lately. [University of Venus]

AUM Collaborates with Student Artists to Create Murals in Learning Center

 

001-Matthew KempEditor’s Note: Today’s guest post is from Matthew Kemp, the Writing Student Services Coordinator at the Learning Center at Auburn University at Montgomery, sharing how they teamed up with student artists to create murals in their tutoring space.

A communal coffee pot (or perhaps a Keurig), grammar textbooks, computers, loose leaf paper: things you’ll probably find in writing centers from Texas to Toronto and beyond. Recently in the WCENTER listserv, a question arose regarding ways a new director could decorate his/her center. Of course, there are many ways to answer this question, and many answers were offered: posters, chairs, rugs, paintings, local newspaper articles. However, the suggestion that struck a chord with me was student art. You see, my multidisciplinary center has three large murals painted on our walls, and all of them were designed by students for a Typography course. My center uses these murals as ways to brand ourselves on campus. They represent our mission as well as our values to students, and we absolutely adore them.

AUM LC Mural 2So how did my center come to have these large murals? I can tell you with certainty, it wasn’t originally our plan! A few years ago, my center relocated from a small room in the nursing building to the second floor of our library tower. We filled our new space with the typical items from above. It wasn’t unlike many other centers across the world: computers, funny memes pinned to the walls, pencils, and scratch paper. The idea of murals never entered our minds. That is, until we saw our student phone operator, a graphic design major, working on some homework for her Typography course. The assignment asked students to sketch and alter letters and numbers.  As our center is a multidisciplinary office, the sketches of various letters and numbers seemed to be a perfect way to illustrate what we did. We asked if she thought her class could do a mural in the same vein as her homework. She was delighted at the prospect! So our director contacted the Typography professor and told her our idea.

The professor immediately agreed. She thought it would give her students not only good experience working with clients but also pride in seeing their work become a part of campus. Our office agreed to buy any materials needed, and she agreed her students would paint it. Campus administration had previously told us we could decorate the space as we pleased, so we didn’t even have to fill out forms or requests (this may not be the case at every university; check in with your campus administration about regulations). As our walls were gray, we asked the students to design a black mural. It also needed to incorporate elements of both numbers and text that represented our services. To get a feel for our attitude and work, we linked the students to our campus website and gave them a copy of our mission statement. Continue reading “AUM Collaborates with Student Artists to Create Murals in Learning Center”

WLN News Round-Up: May 10-31

Here is some of what has been on the WLN news radar lately:

“They Say Every, I Say Any”– Maria Soriano discusses the word choice she uses when talking about college-level writing and the services that the writing center provides. [John Carroll University Writing Center]

“Transparency & Reflection: Why We Write Logs”– This post explains how writing appointment logs about tutoring sessions connects to the core values and beliefs of DePaul’s University Center for Writing-based Learning. [UCWbLing]

DePaul University
DePaul University

“Faking It? Reflections and Regrets from an Occasionally Insincere Writer”– A senior tutor reflects on his own writing during his college career and offers advice to other college students. [Xavier University]

“The Millennial Learners”– For those interested in teaching strategies that will be effective for millennial students, this post lays out some ideas and explains why they work. [University of Venus]

“Syracuse University students hide 155 love letters across campus for finals week”– Students from the organization Campus Cursive wrote and distributed letters across Syracuse University’s campus to help their fellow students cope with finals week. This article is a reminder that we all need to practice self-love and self-care even during busy parts of the academic year, and pass it on to others as well! [Syracuse University]

WLN News Round-Up: April 25-May 8

Here’s some of what has been on the WLN news radar lately:

“We Need to Retain Highly Qualified Directors in College and University Writing Centers,” – This petition calls on administrators to end the practice of dissolving writing centers and replacing qualified writing center directors with administrators  who have minimal experience in writing center administration or theory. Sign to show your support! [Change.org]

Joey Pulone for The Chronicle of Higher Education
Joey Pulone for The Chronicle of Higher Education

“A Final Round of Advice for Final Exams” – Because final exams and the end of the school year are fast approaching at many colleges and universities, The Chronicle of Higher Education has compiled highlights from their posts about finals. One of our favorites is approaching finals as a “finale” rather than an exam. [The Chronicle of Higher Education]

“‘Something Magical in Meeting with a Group of Like-Minded People’: Graduate Writing Groups in the Writing Center – This post discusses the structure of writing groups for graduate students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and then features seven doctoral students who share why they attend the writing groups and what they get out of them. [Another Word]

“Why grad schools should require students to blog”- In this post, Maria Konnikova shares the connections she sees between her academic and popular writing and asserts that academia should more thoroughly embrace non-academic writing pursuits. [Scientific American]

 

WLN News Round-Up: April 11-24

Here’s some of what has been on the WLN news radar lately:

Special announcement!: The Writing Centre at the University of British Columbia was facing closure, but student efforts have succeeded in keeping the Centre open. You can check out our initial post on the UBC closure here and our interview with tutor Cole Klassen here.

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“Streamlining Citations”-  The Modern Language Association is releasing the 8th Edition of the MLA Handbook this month. This article explains some of the major changes and the motivation behind them. Notably, the new edition will include a digital style center. [Inside Higher Ed]

“Is Online Tutoring the Future of Personalized Learning?”- This article discusses the advantages that students who have access to one-on-one learning gain and suggests that online tutoring could be a way to give more students access to personalized learning. While this article focuses on how private companies rather than colleges and universities can leverage online tutoring, it raises important questions about access to educational resources. [EdSurge]

“11 Podcasts for Poetry Lovers”- April is National Poetry Month in the United States! You can celebrate by checking out one of the podcasts in this list. [Book Riot]

Interview with UBC tutor Cole Klassen

Editor’s Note: The University of British Columbia in Canada, which has an enrollment of about 60,000 students, is planning on closing its Writing Centre. Tutors have been fighting to prevent this closure. We interviewed a UBC Writing Centre tutor, Cole Klassen, about current and future efforts to fight the closure of the Writing Centre.

You can find our initial post on the UBC Writing Centre closure here. To show your support for keeping the UBC Writing Centre open, you can sign this petition!

ColeKlassenHeadshot (2)Hi Cole! Can you tell us about your studies at UBC and your work at the Writing Centre?

I transferred from Douglas College to UBC last summer. I’m just finishing my third year. I am in the creative writing BFA program and I am minoring in philosophy. I’ve worked at the UBC writing centre since the start of the fall semester as a peer writing tutor. I began tutoring at the Douglas College Learning Centre, where I worked as an online and face to face writing and content peer tutor for two years.

Who is involved in the efforts to keep the UBC Writing Centre open? What have you done so far?

The movement was started by current and past UBC writing centre tutors. We started by creating the online petition, then worked to spread the word through sharing it on social media, emailing instructors, and visiting their classes to talk to students. One of our tutors also did an interview for the Ubyssey article on the issue. We also emailed Writing Centre experts for advice, such as people from the IWCA. We’ve been collecting letters to submit with the petition as well, from some students, UBC teachers and officials, and writing centre experts. Recently we spoke to some UBC officials about how to proceed with the petition, and plan to submit it soon. Continue reading “Interview with UBC tutor Cole Klassen”

WLN News Round-Up: March 28-April 10

Here’s some of what has been on the WLN news radar lately:

“Two-For-One Deal: Killing Boredom with Procrastination”- Lindsay Oden asserts that students are particularly susceptible to apathetic boredom, which he defines as “that feeling of helplessness or desperation produced by overwhelming circumstances when we procrastinate.” He outlines some specific strategies for avoiding apathetic boredom, such as organizing your workspace. [Inside Higher Ed]

From Inside Higher Ed
From Inside Higher Ed

“What counts as academic writing? #ACWri”- Dr. Raul Pacheco-Vega discusses the focus within academic writing on creating “generative text” and asserts that we should place more value on “non-generative text,” such as emails to colleagues and handwritten notes. [Raul Pacheco]

“An Exercise in Bad Writing”- Dr. Amitava Kumar describes assigning “bad writing” to his students in both fiction and non-fiction writing classes. He explains that through the exercise, students have an opportunity to be creative and identify clichéd writing practices. [The Chronicle of Higher Education]

Interview with Dr. Julie Christoph about NCPTW

Editor’s Note: I chatted with Dr. Julie Christoph, the chair of this year’s National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing (NCPTW), about her work, the theme of this year’s NCPTW, and what we can expect from the conference. The NCPTW will take place November 4-6 at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington. Interested in submitting a proposal? You can find a link to the CFP at the bottom of this post!

Hi Julie! Can you tell us about yourself and your work?

julie christophI’m currently Professor of English and Director of the Center for Writing, Learning, and Teaching at the University of Puget Sound, which is a small liberal arts college in Tacoma, Washington. I developed my love for writing centers as an undergraduate writing center tutor at Carleton College, and I later went on to do my doctoral work in Rhetoric and Composition at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where I taught in the writing center and also served as an early assistant director of the Undergraduate Writing Fellows Program. Though writing centers are what brought me to the field of writing studies, my position as writing center director is relatively new. I have spent most of my career teaching courses in writing, rhetoric, and culture in the English department; consequently, my research agenda is eclectic. My primary area of research explores what is personal to writers about their argumentative writing: how does a writer as a living, breathing person appear on the pages of academic writing? How do writers’ personal histories, predilections, and prejudices enter into their academic writing? To what extent are writers able to be transparent about their personal history and biases in their writing—and to what extent do readers’ responses to writing exceed the limits of what writers have knowingly represented about themselves? As my teaching load has evolved into the writing center, I’ve increasingly moved toward thinking about writer identity in the writing center, and I’m going to be spending part of my sabbatical next year in at Goethe University in Germany doing a contrastive study with some writing center colleagues there.

The theme for this year’s conference is “It’s for Everyone: The Inclusive Writing Center.”  Can you tell us about how this theme was chosen?

The theme of this year’s NCPTW is an extension of work we’ve been doing at the University of Puget Sound’s writing center (or, more accurately, the Center for Writing, Learning, and Teaching). As is the case throughout higher education, our enrollment demographics are changing. Our campus is becoming more racially, economically, and neurologically diverse, and we’ve been making concerted efforts to adapt and change our writing center to meet the needs and interests of our students.

In the last four years, we have refocused our mission around anti-racist and inclusive practices. We’ve had some tremendously useful conversations around concepts like Claude Steele’s “stereotype threat,” and the ideas in the collection Writing Centers and the New Racism. We’d love to continue the conversation with a wider circle of people, so it seemed natural to extend these themes to the conference itself. Continue reading “Interview with Dr. Julie Christoph about NCPTW”

Tutor Perspectives on Dress Code in the Writing Center

Editor’s Note: This post was inspired by a conversation on the WCenter listserv in November about dress code in writing centers. In this post, current tutors share their perspectives on dress codes within their writing centers and their personal considerations when they choose what to wear to work.

Headshot (2)Shannon Henesy- Shannon is a junior studying English and Creative Writing at Salem College in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA. She is the Assistant Director of Salem College’s writing center.

In Salem College’s Writing Center, “appropriate dress code” does not constitute particular wardrobe pieces, per say, but rather takes into account the preferences of the individuals who work there.  Prior to opening in the fall, all of the writing center consultants discussed with our director, Dr. Katie Manthey, how strict dress codes are inherently problematic.  The question which arises from assigning a dress code asks who gets to make the decision as to what is appropriate and what is not; additionally, this ordinance can cause discomfort or disassociation in certain individuals.  We all consider ourselves equal in our writing center, and we collectively came to the decision to not enforce a rigid dress code.  Instead, we choose to present ourselves in clothing in which we feel comfortable.  We believe that the attitudes we put forward contribute to “professionalism” more than the clothes we wear.

That being said, I am certain to have different considerations I take into account than the rest of the consultants.  Personally, I prefer to dress in a manner that makes me feel confident, approachable, and put-together.  An outfit which adheres to these qualifications can vary depending on my mood.  Overall, I want to wear clothes that do not set me apart from the students which come in to be tutored; I want the consultant and the student to be on equal footing, including what we wear.

 

image1Zubayr Chohan– Zubayr is currently working on an Education After Degree (Secondary) at the University of Alberta in Canada and has previously earned a BSc. He is a tutor at the University of Alberta Centre for Writers.

I think that as a male, my decisions on what I wear are less motivated by questions of safety, and instead stem from a desire to be professional. Although we work in a Peer Writing Centre, I still try to dress in a way that might make me seem older, more “professional” in an attempt to be regarded as more of an authority in the field.

I find that the days I wear a t-shirt or hoodie rather than a collared shirt are the days I feel like I may be deemed as less capable or knowledgeable on my subject. That is not to say I wear a suit and tie to the centre, however I have found myself making a conscious decision to dress myself accordingly on tutoring days.

I’d also like to comment that I don’t feel that clients themselves should have a dress code.

Continue reading “Tutor Perspectives on Dress Code in the Writing Center”

WLN News Round-Up: March 16-27

Here’s some of what has been on the WLN news radar lately:

Screen Shot 2016-03-16 at 12.53.52 PMEverything I Know about Writing I Learned From The Bachelor“- Hillary Wentworth, a writing instructor at Walden University, explores the similarities between writing and The Bachelor. My favorite comparison is the one between academic writing and a group date! [Walden University Writing Center]

“Order and Chaos in English Spelling”- Dr. Anne Curzan discusses the assertion that English orthography makes no sense. For those who claim that they would like English spelling to have less irregularities, she offers the challenge: “Which irregular spellings are you willing to part with?” [The Chronicle of Higher Education]

“What Grammar Pedants and Fashion Victims Have in Common”– In honor of National Grammar Day in the United Staes, which was March 4, this article asserts that grammar rules are often as arbitrary and situational as those of fashion. [The Conversation]

Check out this quote from the article:

If your shoes and handbag don’t match, both items will still be entirely practical. In the same way, ending a sentence with a preposition – location words such as on, in – will not make the message less understandable, yet both, to pedantic minds, show a disregard for what is right and proper.

“How This School Library Increased Student Use by 1,000 Percent”- This piece details how a middle school library in Ohio used trends in makerspaces and personalized learning to transform their library. The post includes a list of technology in the new learning center and a video detailing the transformation of the space. [Cult of Pedagogy]

“How To Beat Creative Blocks”– The video below is from the series “The Science of Us” and discusses how creativity increases as we keep working on a project. My question is: What strategies can tutors use to help writers keep working through difficult subjects and ideas? Let us know in the comments! [New York Magazine]

WLN News Round-Up: February 29-March 13

Here’s some of what has been on the WLN news radar lately:

Who does academic writing serve? In this blog post, Jackson Wright Schultz discusses the importance of making academic writing accessible outside of academia, especially when writing about marginalized groups such as the transgender community. [Inside Higher Ed]

From Utah Statesman
From Utah Statesman

Art in the Writing Center. At Utah State University, the writing center exhibits of the artwork of a different student each month. This article explains how the idea was conceived and the types of artwork the writing center has showcased so far. [The Utah Statesman]

Strategies to feel less busy. For students and instructors overwhelmed with the day-to-day work of academia, this article offers concrete tips on reducing the perpetual feeling of being busy. My personal favorite is capping to-do lists at 5 items. [The Guardian]

 

 

#IWCWeek tagboard

Editor’s Note: We’ve really enjoyed looking at all of your social media posts from International Writing Centers Week!  To see what other writing centers were up to, take a look at this tagboard of the #IWCWeek hashtag. If you’re interested in seeing even more posts, #IWCW16 is another great hashtag to check out on Twitter.

WLN News Round-Up: February 15-28

Happy International Writing Centers Week! To celebrate IWCW, staff members from the University of Louisville Writing Center share their favorite parts of writing center work. [UofLWritingCenter]

One tutor, Alex, said,

“Collaborations with writers on resumes, personal statements, and cover letters are my favorite moments as a writing center consultant. There are few moments more nerve-wracking in a person’s life than job or program applications, and I aim to do everything I can to soothe nerves and help writers put their best foot forward.”

Stay tuned for more posts on the blog about International Writing Centers Week, and let us know what your Writing Center is doing to celebrate in the comments!

Inside Higher Ed
Inside Higher Ed

Practice self-care to avoid burn out. Though this post focuses on self-care tips for graduate students, anyone within higher education can benefit from a self-care routine. [Inside Higher Ed]

Is there a connection between doodling and writing? This post outlines several learning styles and provides ample links to resources about them. The author, Veronica Oliver, suggests that explicit understanding of your learning style can lead to improved prewriting and drafting. [Walden University Writing Center]

WLN News Round-Up: February 1-14

Here’s some of what has been on the WLN news radar this week:

Small changes can improve teaching (and tutoring!). James M. Lang offers three activities for boosting engagement in the first few minutes of class. These strategies—such as asking what they already know about a subject—can be useful to tutors as well. With many institutions starting up a new semester, now can be a great time to re-examine teaching and tutoring practices! [The Chronicle of Higher Education]

A new book advocates creating a more individualized higher education experience. This article explores the ideas in Todd Rose’s The End of Average: How to Succeed in a World that Values Sameness. In terms of colleges and universities, Rose advocates for less focus on grades and “seat hours” and more student agency. [Times Higher Education]

Teaching and writing for the ear. Like many writing center professionals, Dr. Stuart Sherman believes in the connection between good writing and reading out loud. Complete with sample feedback, this article walks readers through Sherman’s approach to teaching writing, which relies heavily on students writing for the ear. [PC Mag]

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Special Announcement: Introducing WcORD of the Day! This Facebook page, curated by Patrick Hargon, shares daily posts from WcORD, a searchable database of writing center resources. WcORD invites all members of the writing center community to add their own resources and share the database on their websites and social media outlets!